Use the five feng shui elements—Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water—to create balance and vibrant energy in all areas of your home. For example, if you are working on attracting more prosperity, you can introduce the feng shui elements of Wood and Water in the Southeast area of your house. If you need to improve your health, you can place lush plants (representing the Wood feng shui element) or pieces of wood furniture in the East area of your home.
One of the most important things in laying out your bedroom is to leave equal room on both sides of the bed. "This is symbolic of creating equal space for both you and your partner," explains feng shui expert Laura Cerrano. "Sometimes the dimensions of a bedroom don't allow for this arrangement, so holding the intention of creating space is essential. Even if you could only spare an inch of space between the wall and bed, it's better than nothing. Besides that, having two side tables and lamps is a great go-to general recommendation because it relates to balance." If not for feng shui reasons, we also think symmetry looks better.

The feng shui consultant recognizes that it's not always possible to leave the under-bed area completely clutter-free: "If you do need to store items under the bed, be mindful of who gave these items to you and what emotional content you associate with them." She adds that some items—specifically bedding, clothing, and towels—are better to store under the bed than others. A small number of books is also acceptable, as long as their titles and content are positive.

A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."


The third option of a good feng shui bedroom layout has the bed on the same wall as the door (or the nearby wall), but with the bed being well protected and grounded.  If this is the layout that is most suitable for your space, be sure you leave as much space as possible between the door and the bed, while still allowing enough room for the second nightstand (the one on the side further from the door.)
This can be tough if storage space is at a premium, but avoid storing anything under the bed. "Whatever is below will rise above," says Cerrano. That means you don’t want to store things under the bed that may trigger an emotional response, like bills or mementos from loved ones. Linens and things of that nature are considered neutral, so feel free to store those underneath if needed, but Cerrano notes, “Ideally we want the energy to flow under and around the bed unobstructed.”

I could also build a L-shaped wardrobe in one side of the bed instead, if I don’t place the bed in the middle of the wall, which would create extra space in one side (the bed wouldn’t be squished into a corner, but there would be a considerable difference between the space in one side and the other; let’s say 4 feet in one side and 2 feet in the other side). In your opinion, which scenario would be most optimal? Any remedy for possible issues or variables to avoid?


As you'd probably expect, your headboard and bed frame play a significant role in optimizing the feng shui of your bedroom, according to Cerrano. Choose "a solid wooden headboard and frame," she suggests. This "is a common suggestion in Western feng shui because the element of wood relates to the symbolic nature of supporting your body and energy when sleeping," she explains.
Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]
×