Feng shui is so important to some strong believers, that they use it for healing purposes (although there is no empirical evidence that this practice is in any way effective) in addition to guide their businesses and create a peaceful atmosphere in their homes,[90] in particular in the bedroom where a number of techniques involving colours and arrangement are used to achieve enhanced comfort and more peaceful sleep.[citation needed] In 2005, even Disney acknowledged feng shui as an important part of Chinese culture by shifting the main gate to Hong Kong Disneyland by twelve degrees in their building plans, among many other actions suggested by the master planner of architecture and design at Walt Disney Imagineering, Wing Chao, in an effort to incorporate local culture into the theme park.[91]
It may take just a tiny bit of getting used to, but once you get in the habit of keeping the lid closed on your toilet, you’ll never go back. Here’s why feng shui wisdom considers it important: the toilet literally pulls water and waste down and out of the room. This downward spiraling motion contributes to pulling energy out of your home. This, in turn, corresponds with pulling money and resources out of your life. Simply keeping the toilet lid closed when it’s not in use counterbalances this challenge. And anyway, it’s a much more pleasing and attractive (not to mention hygienic!) design choice. I mean, the toilet conveniently comes with a lid, so you might as well close that thing!
Having a rug to further ground the energy of the bed (and the whole bedroom) brings even more strength to this powerful feng shui bedroom layout. Notice that the other large piece of furniture – a big chest of drawers, an armoire, etc –  is not on the side, but rather at the foot of the bed. This is very important if you want to keep the energy in your bedroom balanced. Now, of course, I know that not all bedrooms are that easy to deal with and there are many details that can prevent you from re-creating this exact feng shui bedroom layout.
Pretending your space has good energy by hanging chimes and crystals just does not work; it is a false (and naive) cover up. So, focus on creating a genuinely strong, healthy and solid foundation, and then apply the wealth and money feng shui tips and cures that truly speak to you. Always choose the wealth feng shui cures that make sense in your home or office; a three legged frog in a modern house may look absolutely ridiculous (unless it has deep meaning to you); and it will sure not work to attract wealth.
Looking for an easy way to incorportate feng shui principles into your bedroom décor? Home accessories offer a low-cost, low-commitment way to test them out in your space. "If you are a feng shui minimalist in how you approach enhancing your bedroom's energy, one area that could be utilized as a soft focal point is with the bed accessories themselves," says Cerrano.
An excellent way to stimulate chi energy for your finances or career is to add a water fountain in your home office or inside the entrance of your home. Make sure the fountain flows into your home or office and never towards the door. You can opt for an aquarium if you prefer. Place it in the North sector of your home or office to stimulate the career sector or in the Southeast to activate the wealth sector. Have at least 8 red fish and 1 black fish, the lucky number of fish, for attracting auspicious chi energy.
I know many of us could use extra storage, but under the bed is not the place for it! In feng shui, it’s best to have the air flow all around you while you’re sleeping, so it’s a big no-no to have objects under the bed—especially sharp, dangerous items. Other items to watch out for are shoes, books, or anything associated with very active energy. If you have mementos from past relationships stored under there, it may mean that relationship is holding you back. If you must store something under the bed, make it something soft, like extra linens and pillows.
Make sure the yin and the yang are represented in equal measure. This doesn't mean that your room has to look like a sterile hotel room; the goal is to make it welcoming to both genders. Balance a floral quilt with a leather trunk at the foot of the bed, or pair a pile of embroidered pillows with a Pendleton wool throw across the bottom of the bed.
When it comes to moving past a failed relationship, your first order of business is cutting the cord to your last one. “We use the word ‘energy cord,’” Cerrano says. “If you have all this stuff from [a past relationship] scattered through your home, it’s energetically creating a cord to that person. When you're done with a relationship, it’s recommended that, at your own pace, you release the things that aren’t beneficial anymore.”
Let’s look at the 3 best feng shui bedroom layouts, understand what makes them so, as well as define variations of each good feng shui bedroom layout. Why is this important? Well, because sometimes you might not be able to position the bed exactly as shown in the diagrams below, so it is good to know the extent to which you can modify each good feng shui bedroom layout.
Benko says there is a slew of emotional issues constantly being displayed in her clients' homes. "Do you have trouble getting clarity? Check if you have stuff all over your surfaces. Do you have self-esteem issues? Check if your mirrors are hung too high, so you can never measure up. Are you chronically single? Assess if you're loading up your home with single imagery—a single vase, a single chair, a single person in a picture."
A feng shui compass is a specialized form of an ordinary magnetic compass. In fact, the magnetic compass was originally invented for use in feng shui, as a tool for positioning buildings and objects within buildings in accordance with cardinal directions for specific feng shui purposes. Before the invention of the compass, directions were determined by astronomical instruments, such as the astrolabe. Also called a luo pan, the feng shui compass is used to access deeper information about a site or a building. It consists of bands of concentric rings arranged around a magnetic needle. In Chinese, luo means "everything" and pan means "bowl." This can be interpreted to mean that the feng shui compass contains all the mysteries of the universe.
Hello, I have a question about your article: “Feng Shui Tips for Money”. Your article says to replace any broken items in your home. We live in a rented apartment and the landlord did not do the usual fix-ups when the former tenants moved out. We moved in with the blinds broken in all four window, cracked closet doors, the door frame to the master bedroom is broken and won’t stay shut when closed (you can simply push the door open when “closed”, you don’t need to use the door knob to open/close the door), bathroom tiles messed up such that you have a hard time opening/closing the door and the closet inside the bathroom, problems with plumbing and the stove and refrigerator…crayola marks everywhere, cigarette burns in the carpets and you get the idea here. The apartment was in such a poor state, we refused to give the landlord a deposit unless we could do a walk-through with him and get it in writing about all the broken and poor conditions of everything. He had a fit and would not do it. We’ve been living here since late August, 2015. He finally fixed the plumbing issues and our heater. But that’s all he fixed. We are not responsible for any of the other things, so how would your Feng Shui tips to repair broken things in the home really apply in our situation? What would be a “work around” for NOT doing repairs to a rented apartment, when they were already there when we moved into the unit? Also, about the citrine in the windowsill.. we have four large windows, each with a windowsill. Do I put a piece of citrine in just one of them or in all four? If in only one windowsill, which one? Kitchen, living room, master bedroom (this is being used as our temple/cat room) – or in our bedroom?
Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world. Learn More
Matteo Ricci (1552–1610), one of the founding fathers of Jesuit China missions, may have been the first European to write about feng shui practices. His account in De Christiana expeditione apud Sinas... tells about feng shui masters (geologi, in Latin) studying prospective construction sites or grave sites "with reference to the head and the tail and the feet of the particular dragons which are supposed to dwell beneath that spot". As a Catholic missionary, Ricci strongly criticized the "recondite science" of geomancy along with astrology as yet another superstitio absurdissima of the heathens: "What could be more absurd than their imagining that the safety of a family, honors, and their entire existence must depend upon such trifles as a door being opened from one side or another, as rain falling into a courtyard from the right or from the left, a window opened here or there, or one roof being higher than another?".[65]
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