Boost your career with a better desk position. Position your desk cater-corner to and facing the office or cube door (even if you don’t actually have a door in your workspace). If you can’t turn your desk to face the door, arrange a mirror on your desk or wall so you can see who’s coming. This adjustment helps you encounter more opportunities, go further in your field, and lose less often.
A few years later I found feng shui again, but this time with a new viewpoint: a Western viewpoint, grounded in tradition but also in science, so it made new sense to me. I tried more feng shui tips from this point of view, but this time the tips seemed to have more of a connection to my actual living space and lifestyle. They forced me to readjust myself in my space and see things in a new way.
Where you place your bed is very important in feng shui. Choose the wrong wall and you risk a long string of restless nights. The path from your bedroom door to the window has the strongest flow of energy; keep your bed out of this path if possible. Positioning your bed in front of a window is a big feng shui no-no. Ideally you should have a solid headboard or wall behind your bed (no diagonal placement either), a small table or chair on either side for support, and a low bench or a trunk at the foot of the bed.
Mirrors reflect energy, so position them in places where you want to increase energy flow. Also, make sure that mirrors reflect something beautiful. "You don't want mirrors to reflect anything low energy or negative, like kitchen trash cans," says Linda Varone, RN, MA, founder of Nurturing Spaces Consulting. Finally, think twice before adding mirrors to your bedroom decor. They can energize the room, which, though it may be great for hot sex, is not so great for getting enough sleep.

Feng Shui (pronounced “fung shway”) examines how the placement of things and objects within it affect the energy flow in your living environment, and how these objects interact with and influence your personal energy flow. Your personal energy flow affects how you think and act, which in turn affects how well you perform and succeed in your personal and professional life. Feng Shui affects you every moment of the day — whether you’re aware of it or not.

Whether you’re on a Marie Kondo-inspired cleaning kick or made a New Year’s resolution to focus on self care, the bedroom is a great place to focus that fresh-start energy. While decluttering is always an excellent way to begin, it may also be time to feng shui your bedroom, which will not only leave it looking nicer but may also help you sleep better.

Regularly check the flow of chi at your house and personal office. A fresh and strong flow of chi, coupled with various feng shui wealth symbols, must be your goal if you are focused on attracting the energy of wealth and abundance. A good chi flow brings an upward moving energy with spaciousness, comfort, and a calming rhythm. For example, make sure hallways are clear of clutter and objects, with pleasant images on the wall.


In Taoist and feng shui theory, yin and yang are opposites that are dependent upon one another and which must always be in balance. The principle of duality—the idea that all things are balanced blends of two things—is at the root of yin/yang theory. While most other spiritual philosophies believe in opposing dualities, such as good vs. evil, the Chinese Taoist system believes that balance and equilibrium between opposites is the desirable state. Discord occurs when one principle outweighs the other. 

It happens to everyone. Your brakes go out, the air conditioner dies and your dog has to have surgery. When bad luck happens, it happens in threes, as the saying goes. And when that much happens all at once, it can take a toll on your finances. Suddenly, that darling pair of shoes goes away, and maybe you get behind on your rent or car payment. That’s when you need money fast, and feng shui can help!
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
×