"Family pictures don't belong in the bedroom," says Whitehurst. "It's the most intimate room in the house and should be reserved for you and your partner." Pictures of children, relatives, and friends may cause you to think about your obligations — and that doesn't allow the mind (or body) to rest. So keep only pictures of you and your spouse or partner in the bedroom, and put other pictures in the dining or family rooms.

The feng shui consultant recognizes that it's not always possible to leave the under-bed area completely clutter-free: "If you do need to store items under the bed, be mindful of who gave these items to you and what emotional content you associate with them." She adds that some items—specifically bedding, clothing, and towels—are better to store under the bed than others. A small number of books is also acceptable, as long as their titles and content are positive.


The same is true with slanted or sloped ceilings. Though the feeling is very subtle, it does give you some sort of unease or feelings of being compressed (worse for claustrophobics), and those feelings carry over whenever you go to bed. This is especially true if you sleep on the side with the lower ceiling. An easy solution is to use a canopy bed. The four pillars that surround you while you sleep have the tendency to make you feel more “supported” from the downward pressure of the ceiling.
The main tools used in feng sui are the compass and the bagua. The bagua, or the energy map, is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the I Ching, the ancient oracle on which feng shui is based. The Compass , or Luo-Pan, is used to access the deeper information of a building. It consists of bands of concentric rings arranged around the magnetic needle.
Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.
If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.
Rearrange furniture to help the chi energy to move freely around your house. Visualize the chi energy as water entering your home and attempting to flow from room to room. Move the furniture out of the natural pathways and don't overcrowd rooms with furniture. Leave space enough between pieces of furniture so the chi energy can move about the entire room.
The second best feng shui bedroom layout has the door to the side but the bed is still further away from the door, has a solid wall behind it and good grounding energy on both sides. Notice the biggest piece of furniture is again balancing the energy well (visualize a triangle between the two nightstands and the chest of drawers, this shows you the best furniture layout for a bedroom).

According to feng shui expert, Rodika Tchi, Chi is manifested in yin yang characteristics, or the idea that our universe is made up of two opposing yet deeply interconnected forces of Yin and Yang. It is important to identify sources of imbalance and create once again the right amount for those that occupy a particular space and also for the space's original purpose. For example, a bedroom should be a place of rest and not of entertainment - at least not of electronic entertainment anyway - and there are specific feng shui guidelines you can follow to ensure this.


In feng shui, it's said that mirrors in front of the bed invite a third person into the marriage. Mirrors are also thought to reflect energy around a space, which could disrupt your sleep. If you do need to have a mirror, make sure it's facing something that you love looking at. (This may seem like common sense, but it's something a lot of us forget about!)

Regularly check the flow of chi at your house and personal office. A fresh and strong flow of chi, coupled with various feng shui wealth symbols, must be your goal if you are focused on attracting the energy of wealth and abundance. A good chi flow brings an upward moving energy with spaciousness, comfort, and a calming rhythm. For example, make sure hallways are clear of clutter and objects, with pleasant images on the wall.


A feng shui compass is a specialized form of an ordinary magnetic compass. In fact, the magnetic compass was originally invented for use in feng shui, as a tool for positioning buildings and objects within buildings in accordance with cardinal directions for specific feng shui purposes. Before the invention of the compass, directions were determined by astronomical instruments, such as the astrolabe. Also called a luo pan, the feng shui compass is used to access deeper information about a site or a building. It consists of bands of concentric rings arranged around a magnetic needle. In Chinese, luo means "everything" and pan means "bowl." This can be interpreted to mean that the feng shui compass contains all the mysteries of the universe.
Feng shui is so important to some strong believers, that they use it for healing purposes (although there is no empirical evidence that this practice is in any way effective) in addition to guide their businesses and create a peaceful atmosphere in their homes,[90] in particular in the bedroom where a number of techniques involving colours and arrangement are used to achieve enhanced comfort and more peaceful sleep.[citation needed] In 2005, even Disney acknowledged feng shui as an important part of Chinese culture by shifting the main gate to Hong Kong Disneyland by twelve degrees in their building plans, among many other actions suggested by the master planner of architecture and design at Walt Disney Imagineering, Wing Chao, in an effort to incorporate local culture into the theme park.[91]

Without question, the money is always at the front door. Give your porch and front door area a good cleaning. Is there a broken light bulb or a dying plant? Anything that doesn’t work properly, look auspicious or that’s dirty (like a light fixture with dead bugs in it), will lower your financial energy. Spruce up your front door and walkway. Add a pretty pot of flowers here and keep the porch light on and the area will-lit to invite money and opportunity to your home.
4. Ventilate and brighten, in other words encourage good quality air to circulate and let lots of light into your house. These two elements are essential for good chi. Open bedroom windows first thing in the morning to allow moisture to escape (taking care not to leave ground floor rooms unattended for security reasons). And once you’ve exhausted all possible avenues to let in natural light, consider using full-spectrum lighting to further brighten up a space.
This energy she speaks of, also known as chi, is the foundation of feng shui. Good quality chi in your home is believed to promote strong relationships, support health and wealth and contribute to a better sense of well-being. If your bedroom is cluttered, has too many bright colors and is positioned poorly, your feng shui (and sleep) will suffer. Here are some of Cho’s feng shui tips for building a peaceful bedroom for better sleep.
If designed right, though, your bedroom has limitless potential. Between those four walls, you can have a sanctuary, a REM fortress, a dream world… This space can also symbolize your relationship with yourself, your partner and the most important things in your life. And feng shui — the ancient Chinese practice of balancing energies in any given space by placing your furniture and belongings a certain way — might help.
In feng shui, chi is what we call life force energy: known to yogis as prana. And the front door is known in feng shui as the “mouth of chi.” In other words, it’s the place where blessings and abundance of all varieties enter both your home and your life. As such, abundant wealth, as well as the consistency of your financial flow, correspond with the appearance and condition of your front door. That’s why a clean, bright red door is an iconic feng shui image: red relates not only to prosperity, but also to vitality, success, and general positivity. But you need not have a red door (unless you want one). Just make sure you love the way it looks, it’s clean, it’s in good repair, it doesn’t squeak or stick, it has full range of motion (nothing is behind it), and the area around it (the entire entryway) is also beautiful and uplifting.

Today, we are exposed to various feng shui systems and school of thoughts but classical feng shui, the one documented in classical Chinese texts, is divided into just two major systems: the oldest one which focuses on the observation of landforms and environmental features and the youngest one which is primarily based on formulas and takes in consideration that Qi changes over time but it is cyclical so it can be tracked and anticipated.
Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!
Imagine if that happens to you in the middle of the night. How would you feel? Though sometimes your kids or your pet may have created the clutter by your bed, make it a habit to keep your bedroom free of clutter. Further, a clean and organized bedroom is more visually relaxing and less likely to invoke frustration and agitation that lower your sleep quality.
General neglect. Some people's dining rooms are a dumping ground for mail, kids' stuff—just a mess that never gets cleared. And in some homes the room is totally ignored; no one ever sets foot in there. This depletes its energy, which makes it even less appealing. If you don't often use the room for meals, activate it in another way. Put a plant there so you're forced to come in and water it. Or bring your laptop in and use the space as an office.

Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.
According to feng shui expert, Rodika Tchi, Chi is manifested in yin yang characteristics, or the idea that our universe is made up of two opposing yet deeply interconnected forces of Yin and Yang. It is important to identify sources of imbalance and create once again the right amount for those that occupy a particular space and also for the space's original purpose. For example, a bedroom should be a place of rest and not of entertainment - at least not of electronic entertainment anyway - and there are specific feng shui guidelines you can follow to ensure this.
Speaking from personal experience back in my college days, there are many ways to hurt yourself if your bedroom is filled with clutter. You can trip on something. You can step on your own clutter. Worse, you can stub your toe. The pain associated with that can wake you fully and can completely disrupt your sleeping cycle. Maybe you can relate to this funny Vine video that shows “how it really feels when you stub your pinky toe”:

7. Let there be light. When lighting your bedroom, flexibility is key. You want lots of natural light during the day, soft light in the evening, and darkness while you sleep. Exposure to sunlight first thing in the morning influences your serotonin levels and can affect you for the rest of the day. When choosing your light, make sure to provide a variety of sources, include overhead, table, and wall lighting.
Bright lights rev up energy. If you're trying to keep energy costs down, then place high-wattage bulbs in the hallways, and lower-wattage bulbs in the rest of the house. "Hallways represent the meridians; the brighter the wattage, the more clean and clear your veins and arteries are," says Whitehurst. Want to light up internally? Place objects around your house that elicit positive emotions and lift your own personal chi. If a particular item makes you feel giddy, put it in a place where it's easy to see.
In a practical world, televisions and laptops are often a necessary evil in your sacred bedroom space. It's impossible to get away from technology, so a compromise solution is to place your TV in an armoire or another cabinet that can be closed when you're finished watching TV for the night. Close your laptop when not being used and store inside a nightstand or drawer. That way, they are at least out of sight and your space while you rest.
In feng shui, a cluttered house equals a cluttered mind. Even worse, clutter literally sucks up the energy in a space. "You may think you're hiding your clutter, but the closet has as much of an effect on energy flow as anything else," says Whitehurst. If there's clutter somewhere in your home — even tucked away in an attic — then it's also cluttering your head, as well as the rest of your body.
too long a list. if u follow every bit written here, you will literally go insane. what i know is that our human brains acclimatise to our surroundings. I was once in africa where noise was always a problem including bedrooms that broke all the laws you hav elisted here. I had a problem sleeping the irst few weeks but I finally got used to it coz i had no where else to go. If the brain realises that there is no solution BI can tell u from experience that it will take on anything.
The southeast sector is the wealth sector and can be activated by good luck charms and feng shui cures. Stimulate it by adding the element of wood, like a jade plant, or a symbol of wealth, like three Chinese coins tied together with a red ribbon. A three-legged toad with a Chinese coin in its mouth is also an auspicious symbol of wealth. A water feature will feed the wood element and stimulate a growth in wealth. Be sure the water flows into the home and not away.
If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
The most famous feng shui wealth fish is the arowana, or dragon fish, and the purest arowanas are known to command quite high fees. However, the koi, or gold fish, are just as effective, as well as a pleasure to look at. Go for 8 or 9 fish, one of them being black color. Aquariums are auspicious because they bring a harmonious combination of several wealth attracting feng shui factors. 

History aside (if you are curious, you can read my articles on how feng shui started) – what is feng shui in a nutshell and why should you care? Let’s stay with this question for a bit. Feng shui is, first and foremost, energy work. The most accurate definition of feng shui is of feng shui as acupuncture of the space. Feng shui opens up powerful energy channels in your home to help it get stronger, more harmonious and powerful. This, in turns, nourishes and strengthens your own energy.

It may take just a tiny bit of getting used to, but once you get in the habit of keeping the lid closed on your toilet, you’ll never go back. Here’s why feng shui wisdom considers it important: the toilet literally pulls water and waste down and out of the room. This downward spiraling motion contributes to pulling energy out of your home. This, in turn, corresponds with pulling money and resources out of your life. Simply keeping the toilet lid closed when it’s not in use counterbalances this challenge. And anyway, it’s a much more pleasing and attractive (not to mention hygienic!) design choice. I mean, the toilet conveniently comes with a lid, so you might as well close that thing!


When building the new entrance to Hong Kong Disneyland, Walt Disney executives decided to shift the angle of the front gate by 12 degrees. They did so after consulting a feng shui specialist, who said the change would ensure prosperity for the park. Disney also put a bend in the walkway from the train station to the gate, to make sure the flow of positive energy, or chi, did not slip past the entrance and out to the China Sea. Heeding the advice of a feng shui consultant is one of many steps Disney executives have taken at the park to reflect the local culture -- and to make sure they do not repeat some mistakes of the past.
Be aware of the position of the windows. If you can, try to avoid placing your bed between the window and a door, or you'll be in the middle of the "draught" of chi running between these two places. If you can't avoid it, just make sure you have nice, pleasant curtains to block some of the bad energy. You should also avoid sleeping facing the window, if you can, or your sleep won't be as restful.
Where you place your bed is very important in feng shui. Choose the wrong wall and you risk a long string of restless nights. The path from your bedroom door to the window has the strongest flow of energy; keep your bed out of this path if possible. Positioning your bed in front of a window is a big feng shui no-no. Ideally you should have a solid headboard or wall behind your bed (no diagonal placement either), a small table or chair on either side for support, and a low bench or a trunk at the foot of the bed.
Speaking of the entry way being beautiful and uplifting, wind chimes help purify the energy near the front door while calling in positivity and blessings. So as long as you won’t be irritating the neighbors (never a good feng shui strategy), find some wind chimes with a sound you adore and hang them near the front door to invite more money into your life.
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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