Chi is energy. It is the constantly moving and changing life force that we feel around us making us feel either good or bad in a certain location. Chi can accumulate in the objects around you. In your home or office, the chi will flow in through the door and out through the windows. The goal of Feng Shui improvements (or "cures") is to keep the chi flowing gently throughout your environment rather than running straight through it. Chi can have a negative effect on your surroundings when it gets stuck or blocked.

This means that if you want to stay healthy, happy, enjoy love and success, your space has to support and nourish this energy. It has to be well suited for your personal energy, as well as the energy you want to attract and cultivate. Just like being in a company of a happy person makes your own energy happy, the same happens with your living (or working) space. If your space has good feng shui vibes — healthy, uplifting, loving and nourishing, you will feel supported and happy. Everything will flow easier for you just because this is the energy you are surrounded by and nourished most often.
If designed right, though, your bedroom has limitless potential. Between those four walls, you can have a sanctuary, a REM fortress, a dream world… This space can also symbolize your relationship with yourself, your partner and the most important things in your life. And feng shui — the ancient Chinese practice of balancing energies in any given space by placing your furniture and belongings a certain way — might help.

Decluttering must be thorough—simply hiding your stuff won’t cut it. Items under the furniture, overloaded bookcases and closets, and outdated or broken items all affect chi flow. It’s time to clear out closets, the space under the bed and all cabinets and shelves. Keep only the items you love—or ones that have special meaning—and discard or donate the old and unused.
Feng shui for wealth is one of the most popular applications of feng shui.  The focus on attracting material wealth is actually one of the reasons feng shui became so popular in the West, since we’ve heard about many business tycoons using feng shui for more profits and stronger financial security. Of course, there is much more to feng shui than its wealth building appeal! You can use feng shui to create a better quality of life, improve your health, attract more harmony to your relationships, help build a successful career, etc.

The "form" in Form School refers to the shape of the environment, such as mountains, rivers, plateaus, buildings, and general surroundings. It considers the five celestial animals (phoenix, green dragon, white tiger, black turtle, and the yellow snake), the yin-yang concept and the traditional five elements (Wu Xing: wood, fire, earth, metal, and water).
Many people get concerned about the bathroom when it comes to Feng Shui. The idea is that the water goes out of the home here. Since water is related to wealth, we don’t want our money being flushed away. I have also been taught that water comes back in as it’s being drained, but to be safe, I recommend that you keep the toilet seat cover down and the bathroom door closed to reduce this effect.
Speaking from personal experience back in my college days, there are many ways to hurt yourself if your bedroom is filled with clutter. You can trip on something. You can step on your own clutter. Worse, you can stub your toe. The pain associated with that can wake you fully and can completely disrupt your sleeping cycle. Maybe you can relate to this funny Vine video that shows “how it really feels when you stub your pinky toe”:
To bring good vibes to your space, you might want to consider purging unwanted items from your bedroom. "If you store objects from your past or present that you do not associate with beneficial emotional memories or energetic frequencies, it could negatively influence your aura (energy field), dreams, emotions, and thoughts on a subconscious level," cautions Cerrano.
The feng shui consultant recognizes that it's not always possible to leave the under-bed area completely clutter-free: "If you do need to store items under the bed, be mindful of who gave these items to you and what emotional content you associate with them." She adds that some items—specifically bedding, clothing, and towels—are better to store under the bed than others. A small number of books is also acceptable, as long as their titles and content are positive.
There is a specific money area in feng shui that needs to be treated right, and for this, you have to know the bagua, or the feng shui energy of your space. Here I am referring to the creation of a small altar/shrine/sacred space that you devote to the energy of wealth. It can be anywhere (except your bathroom, laundry or garage), and as big or as small as you like. Basically, you want to create an area that has the task of collecting wealth energy. Decorate it with meaningful to you items of wealth (jewelry, specific photos, objects of value, etc),  as well as good feng shui energy activators such as crystals and plants.

Is it okay if my head faces the door? The foot of my bed doesn’t face anything, and my head of the bed is against the wall where behind it is my main entrance door to the home. I have both sides of the bed free (not against a wall, but on one side, there’s the bedroom door, the other side, the window. When I open my bedroom door, there is about 2-3 feet of space to my the bed, idk if it’s still good or bad feng shui? Thank you!
According to Brophy, clinging to the past disturbs peace in the present. "Keeping objects out of obligation or reluctance to let go is an issue," Brophy says. "I worked with a client who kept a bed frame that her husband used to sleep in with his ex-wife. Every time she looked at that bed frame she was reminded of his past. If you have furnishings or artwork that you fought your family member to obtain, or won in divorce proceedings, evaluate the energetic cost of keeping such things."

The astronomical history of feng shui is evident in the development of instruments and techniques. According to the Zhouli, the original feng shui instrument may have been a gnomon. Chinese used circumpolar stars to determine the north–south axis of settlements. This technique explains why Shang palaces at Xiaotun lie 10° east of due north. In some of the cases, as Paul Wheatley observed,[15] they bisected the angle between the directions of the rising and setting sun to find north. This technique provided the more precise alignments of the Shang walls at Yanshi and Zhengzhou. Rituals for using a feng shui instrument required a diviner to examine current sky phenomena to set the device and adjust their position in relation to the device.[16]
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