Any images you hang on your bedroom walls should be inspiring, uplifting, or relaxing. One of the best places to hang such an image is on the wall opposite your bed so that you see it first thing when you wake up and the last thing before you turn off the lights to go to sleep. Don't bring sad or upsetting images into your bedroom, or paintings or photographs that feature just one person: This symbolizes solitude. It's also best to avoid images in which a lake, waterfall, or river is the dominant theme. In other parts of the house, water symbolizes money, but in the bedroom, it may promote financial or relationship losses. 

Victorian-era commentators on feng shui were generally ethnocentric, and as such skeptical and derogatory of what they knew of feng shui.[66] In 1896, at a meeting of the Educational Association of China, Rev. P.W. Pitcher railed at the "rottenness of the whole scheme of Chinese architecture," and urged fellow missionaries "to erect unabashedly Western edifices of several stories and with towering spires in order to destroy nonsense about fung-shuy".[67]
Feng shui is so important to some strong believers, that they use it for healing purposes (although there is no empirical evidence that this practice is in any way effective) in addition to guide their businesses and create a peaceful atmosphere in their homes,[90] in particular in the bedroom where a number of techniques involving colours and arrangement are used to achieve enhanced comfort and more peaceful sleep.[citation needed] In 2005, even Disney acknowledged feng shui as an important part of Chinese culture by shifting the main gate to Hong Kong Disneyland by twelve degrees in their building plans, among many other actions suggested by the master planner of architecture and design at Walt Disney Imagineering, Wing Chao, in an effort to incorporate local culture into the theme park.[91]
Nature creates a sense of peace. In fact, research shows that viewing nature reduces anger and anxiety and enhances feelings of pleasure. So flood your home with natural light, open windows and doors to let fresh air inside, and bring plants indoors. Decorate with bamboo, wood, or wicker, and use stones and rocks to add texture. You can also adorn the walls with paintings of nature and its serenity.
Since energy enters through the main portal (read: your front door), you don't want to have it shoot straight up the stairs, says the feng shui expert. Remember how you envisioned the chi as a guest? When you invite a visitor into your home, it would be weird for them to head straight to the fridge or the bedroom, right? Instead, you want them to linger in the common area. 
"To further harmonize the energy of your bedroom, keeping it organized and being very selective with the type of objects you bring into it (e.g., images, artwork, colors, textiles) play a collaborative role in enhancing your space," says Cerrano. And if you're looking to expand the good energy into the rest of your space, find out how to achieve a happy and healthy home, according to feng shui, here.
The practice and application of feng shui provides ways to harmonize every aspect of your life -- each object, color, and material in your environment is arranged to increase the flow of good energy and decrease conflict and stress. The physical changes to a space are pragmatic; the spiritual effects of those changes are personal, uplifting, and dynamic.
The Chinese people consider that you can attract luck and prosperity in your career by using money, just not any kind of money, but I-Ching coins. These are round coins, with a square cut out in the center, linked together with a red silk thread. These tiny coins can be carried in the wallet, or connected to the phone, after the latest fashion trend. The most important thing is to carry them with you, especially if you work in retail or sales, to bring you luck.
Rather than prescribe a set colour palette for the bedroom, traditional feng shui emphasizes the pursuit of balance. If your bedroom is a sunny beachside retreat, then crisp starched linens and light blue accents will feel cool and refreshing in contrast. If, on the other hand, your bedroom is in a snowy mountaintop lodge, accents of warm reds, dark woods, and golden lamplight will provide much needed warmth.
Feng Shui (pronounced “fung shway”) examines how the placement of things and objects within it affect the energy flow in your living environment, and how these objects interact with and influence your personal energy flow. Your personal energy flow affects how you think and act, which in turn affects how well you perform and succeed in your personal and professional life. Feng Shui affects you every moment of the day — whether you’re aware of it or not.
That's up to you. Some people love looking outside and seeing life go by; others feel invaded. But if you have a big window opposite the front door, the energy can fly right out the window, so it's good to address that: Use drapes or blinds. Or put something in front of the window, like a plant or a pretty reflective bowl, to bounce energy back into the room.
According to feng shui expert, Rodika Tchi, Chi is manifested in yin yang characteristics, or the idea that our universe is made up of two opposing yet deeply interconnected forces of Yin and Yang. It is important to identify sources of imbalance and create once again the right amount for those that occupy a particular space and also for the space's original purpose. For example, a bedroom should be a place of rest and not of entertainment - at least not of electronic entertainment anyway - and there are specific feng shui guidelines you can follow to ensure this.

When you see the homes of wealthy people, the number one thing that you actually see is open space. An abundance of open space. Strange, no? Rarely do you see wealthy houses full to the brim with all sorts of stuff. It is the luxury of open space and plenty of breathing room that attracts more wealth energy. In feng shui terms this basically means there is open space to allow more and to enjoy more. To create more, explore more and be more.
The idea, says Benko, is to strike a balance between all elements. "A lot of times, people are drawn to elements that they either need more of, or that's a great cause of imbalance in their lives." For instance, people having issues with aggression should be mindful of not having too much fire elements as part of their decor, like a bright red wall. Conversely, personality types lacking motivation should infuse more of the fire element in their homes to give them a boost. 
Whether you're looking for balance and harmony in your home, office or diet, feng shui is the latest (by Western standards, anyway) miracle cure for all that ails you. But, in fact, the concept of "chi," the energy that feng shui strives to balance, can be traced to Taoism, a Chinese philosophy that dates back to the sixth century B.C. The Taoist belief asserts that human language is incapable of ex­plaining our existence in the world. Chi is a power beyond the physical world.
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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