In feng shui philosophy, your bedroom symbolizes you and affects you the most. We spend many hours sleeping in our beds, so the feng shui of our bedrooms is of the utmost importance. Once you get the bed in the commanding position, it’s also important to have space available on both sides of the bed. This means that you’ve made space for your partner (or future partner). Believe me: Nobody likes to sleep on the wall side! This also allows for a nightstand on each side of the bed. The nightstands do not have to match; however, it’s better if they are similar in size. If possible, there should be at least 2 feet of walking space on the left and right side of the bed, with the headboard against the wall. Yes, you do need a headboard! A solid headboard without bars or holes, fastened securely to the bed, creates stability and harmony. Finally, take some time to make your bed every morning and thank it for supporting you every night. It’s a beautiful way to start your day with a little bit of order and peace. That energy resonates throughout the whole day until your bed welcomes you back to sleep at night.
The ancient Chinese method of Feng Shui helps us to balance our homes and create happier, more successful lives, room by room. We often turn our attention to the bedroom, the sanctuary where we can rest and recharge. Having the proper Feng Shui in the bedroom can help your romantic life as well as your ability to rest and to feel in control. You have to know how to keep the chi flowing, and how to deflect any negative energy that may enter your room -- and your life.
Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."

Place grounding and balanced energy on both sides of the bed. Place two nightstands on either side of the bed to create balance while you sleep. Ideally, you can also place the same lamp on both nightstands, to add some soft lighting to your bedroom. This balance is important for keeping you centered, and especially for maintaining equality in a relationship if you share the bedroom with your partner.


You'll also want to consult a Bagua map to see what elements to pull into your space. Locate what Bagua your bedroom is located in relationship to the front door of your house, and add accessories accordingly. For example, if your bedroom falls in the Health and Family area, where the dominant element is wood, try to incorporate greens and blues in order to sustain that element.

The feng shui tips for money are simple to incorporate into your home. Feng shui for wealth won’t bring you abundance if you don’t strive for it. What feng shui for prosperity does is provide support and foster a space to attract the energy of wealth and money into your life. These feng shui tips for money will create a flow of energy in your home that welcomes wealth and abundance. Use these feng shui tips for wealth in the home or office.
When it comes to color, Marks believes, "Color is usually used to enhance a particular kind of energy (element) or to balance the yin/yang relationship. Some feng shui consultants work with color a lot, others not so much, saying that there are more powerful ways to affect the energies. Personally, I love color and use it a lot because it can have a tremendous impact on how we feel in a space." Decorate the bedroom walls in color, texture, patterns, and artwork. Use feng shui compass directions to aid you in color selection.
If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
To demystify some of the rules of this ancient Chinese tradition, we tapped New York–based professor, feng shui expert, and author of The Holistic Home, Laura Benko to give us simple, actionable tips on how to incorporate its philosophy in our homes. Benko is widely acclaimed for having rebranded feng shui into a more modern, holistic approach while still honoring age-old traditions. To Benko, feng shui is not about transforming the structure of a home, but about making our homes evolve with us. Though nearly imperceptible, these small tweaks can have a "profound impact on your daily life," she insists.
Whether you're looking for balance and harmony in your home, office or diet, feng shui is the latest (by Western standards, anyway) miracle cure for all that ails you. But, in fact, the concept of "chi," the energy that feng shui strives to balance, can be traced to Taoism, a Chinese philosophy that dates back to the sixth century B.C. The Taoist belief asserts that human language is incapable of ex­plaining our existence in the world. Chi is a power beyond the physical world.
Crystals are the powerhouses of good feng shui energy; they bring the essence of abundance from deep within the earth. If you are new to crystals, start with clear quartz, preferably in a rough/natural shape. Along with the clear quartz, there are 3 more crystals that can help you attract the energy of wealth: pyrite, citrine and amethyst. Pyrite is excellent as a wealth feng shui magnet, and reasonably easy to find and well priced. Genuine citrine tends to be pricey and a bit hard to find;  amethyst is easy to find, works very well on many levels, including purifying the energy in your home. If there are no crystal shops close to where you live, check our online selection of feng shui crystals (our store is powered by amazon.com).
Ok, let’s move on to specific feng shui wealth essentials. The main feng shui wealth color is gold, gold, gold (of course!)  In any decor items – mirrors,  frames, lamp bases, trays, coffee tables, etc – whatever your house decor can feel harmonious and happy with! Just be sure to actually love those golden beauties, do not bring something just for the sake of its look if you are not connected to it emotionally.
When it comes to getting a good night's sleep, we'll readily admit that there are very few things we won't try. From lowering our thermostats to upgrading our mattresses, we've spilled a lot of ink on strategies for getting solid shut-eye. But as it turns out, optimizing our beds' feng shui could be one of the simpler ways of ensuring we get a restful night's sleep.
To truly feng shui your bedroom, look to the ceiling as well. “We try to avoid sleeping under a sloping ceiling or under beams,” says Los. She explains that sloped ceilings create an uneven distribution of energy in the room, which gets pushed down onto the bed. "It’s like a drip of water dropping on you overnight, and you end up feeling oppressed. It’s very subtle, but a lot of these things are subtle."

Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world.
Whether you’re on a Marie Kondo-inspired cleaning kick or made a New Year’s resolution to focus on self care, the bedroom is a great place to focus that fresh-start energy. While decluttering is always an excellent way to begin, it may also be time to feng shui your bedroom, which will not only leave it looking nicer but may also help you sleep better.
If you have anything hanging right above your bed, such as a chandelier, you will get that same feeling of discomfort because you may not feel 100% safe, and the effects are worse if it is hanging right above your head. The cure is to remove that furniture and place it somewhere else, like right above a dining table, where people will not reside right under it.
The ancient Chinese method of Feng Shui helps us to balance our homes and create happier, more successful lives, room by room. We often turn our attention to the bedroom, the sanctuary where we can rest and recharge. Having the proper Feng Shui in the bedroom can help your romantic life as well as your ability to rest and to feel in control. You have to know how to keep the chi flowing, and how to deflect any negative energy that may enter your room -- and your life.
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Put your books elsewhere. You can keep a few books in your room if you read to put yourself to sleep, but too many books can make you feel overwhelmed in the space. Your bedroom is a place for rest and relaxation, and if you have too many books there, it will be too much like a place for work. Too many books in your resting space can also be overwhelming.[4]
The entry and front door to your home represent the way you face the outside. It’s how the world sees you, like a first impression. Be sure to keep the area clean and clutter-free. This does not mean the entry must be completely empty; rather it’s about keeping only what you need there. So if it’s winter, it makes sense to hang your scarf, hat, and coat there. The interior and exterior entry should also be well lit (get some bright bulbs on a dimmer!). Lastly, be sure your door number is clean, hung straight, and easily visible. Auspicious opportunities need clear signage to find you! In addition, I often recommend a nice black rectangular welcome mat to attract good energy.
For efficiency's sake, it's never practical to have two work stations situated back-to-back. Think about what it'll look like when two people are cooking. This is why many kitchen experts will suggest a triangular set up between the fridge, stove, and sink. But Benko suggests there is also a feng shui reasoning behind it: "There can be a conflict in the house when you have fire right across from water—water puts out fire."
The Book of Burial says that burial takes advantage of "vital qi". Wu Yuanyin[25] (Qing dynasty) said that vital qi was "congealed qi", which is the state of qi that engenders life. The goal of feng shui is to take advantage of vital qi by appropriate siting of graves and structures.[22] Some people destroyed graveyards of their enemies to weaken their qi.[26][27][28][29][30]
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