While some traditional Chinese feng shui money cures such as the three legged toad, the Dragon Turtle, the Gem Tree or the Lucky Cat might not appeal to your taste (I know I do not use them!); there are still plenty of popular and powerful feng shui for wealth cures that you might like. Look into the Lucky Bamboo, the Wealth Ship or the Money Tree, to name just a few, and see if your money area can benefit from their energy.
Many people get concerned about the bathroom when it comes to Feng Shui. The idea is that the water goes out of the home here. Since water is related to wealth, we don’t want our money being flushed away. I have also been taught that water comes back in as it’s being drained, but to be safe, I recommend that you keep the toilet seat cover down and the bathroom door closed to reduce this effect.
Finally, the health and vitality of your houseplants mirrors the health and vitality of everything in your life, including your finances. This means that if one of your houseplants is struggling, do your best to revive it, and if you can’t seem to do so after a reasonable length of time, give it to one of your houseplant whisperer friends, or release it with love to a compost bin (trust me, it’s best for both you and the plant). And if you seem to have trouble with houseplants generally, you might try lucky bamboo. All you have to do to keep it happy is keep it in bright, indirect light and change the water every week or two. (Here are some hints and tips for keeping lucky bamboo extra healthy.)

5. Minimize. Your bedroom should be a place of rest, contemplation, and intimacy. Exercise equipment, phones, and a TV give off and take up a lot of energy. The bedroom is a place where you turn off the stresses of the day. If you must have your bedroom serve double duty, use a folding screen or hanging fabric to conceal them. If you’re not willing to part with your TV, keep it in an armoire or cabinet so you can shut the door while you sleep.
Beginning with palatial structures at Erlitou,[10] all capital cities of China followed rules of feng shui for their design and layout. During the Zhou era, the Kaogong ji (simplified Chinese: 考工记; traditional Chinese: 考工記; "Manual of Crafts") codified these rules. The carpenter's manual Lu ban jing (simplified Chinese: 鲁班经; traditional Chinese: 魯班經; "Lu ban's manuscript") codified rules for builders. Graves and tombs also followed rules of feng shui, from Puyang to Mawangdui and beyond. From the earliest records, the structures of the graves and dwellings seem to have followed the same rules.
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