The feng shui tips for money are simple to incorporate into your home. Feng shui for wealth won’t bring you abundance if you don’t strive for it. What feng shui for prosperity does is provide support and foster a space to attract the energy of wealth and money into your life. These feng shui tips for money will create a flow of energy in your home that welcomes wealth and abundance. Use these feng shui tips for wealth in the home or office.
Broken things have no place in your home. Everyone I know would be upset about a broken car, but they have broken door handles, broken appliances and all sorts of broken architecture everywhere in their living environment. Your space is a mirror of you. Don’t let it stay broken! While fixing things in your home you may find it easier to confront and fix other lingering issues or problems in your life at the same time.
Energy flows through a room like water in a stream — swiftly through the deepest channels, more slowly along the bank, and not at all in that pile of junk in the corner. Plan your room's layout with the eye of a feng shui practitioner: eliminate stagnant areas like half-completed projects or piles of unfolded laundry, make sure closets aren't overcrowded, and keep the passageways around your room easy to navigate and free from clutter to let the chi flow.

Smell: I advise using essential oils in an ultrasonic diffuser or in a candle diffuser (most wax candles these days are packed with synthetic fragrances). Limit it to a few drops of oil in diluted in water, and don't leave them diffusing for more than an hour or two. They are potent! I love lavender and jasmine oils for a calming smell before bed. If I have a cough, I'll go with ravintsara or eucalyptus. Looking to amp up the sexual energy? Check out cinnamon, ylang-ylang, and best of all, winter savory.


This is a little similar to having your bedroom right above a kitchen stove. Some say the fire energy from the kitchen stove can cause insomnia and other health problems arising from lack of sleep. A more scientific explanation is that the wall transfers heat from the kitchen, which in turn reduces your sleep quality. Also, the sound of the refrigerator and water moving to the kitchen can all bring noise to your bedroom.
An old feng shui remedy for finances is to hang a mirror in the dining room so that it reflects the dining table. The dining table is a symbol of a family's abundance since meals are served here to nourish and support the family. A mirror will double abundance. Just be sure that the mirror doesn't reflect an exterior door or opportunities and money will be bounced right out of the house!
I could also build a L-shaped wardrobe in one side of the bed instead, if I don’t place the bed in the middle of the wall, which would create extra space in one side (the bed wouldn’t be squished into a corner, but there would be a considerable difference between the space in one side and the other; let’s say 4 feet in one side and 2 feet in the other side). In your opinion, which scenario would be most optimal? Any remedy for possible issues or variables to avoid?

The ideal location of your bedroom is far from any doors that open to the outside world. Avoid bedrooms with sloping roofs. If you have to sleep underneath a sloping roof, you can use a canopy bed to weaken the effect. A canopy can also provide protection from other negative ceiling elements, like bright light fixtures, a bathroom on the floor directly above you, and a ceiling fan.
Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.
The main tools used in feng sui are the compass and the bagua. The bagua, or the energy map, is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the I Ching, the ancient oracle on which feng shui is based. The Compass , or Luo-Pan, is used to access the deeper information of a building. It consists of bands of concentric rings arranged around the magnetic needle.
Interesting bits of historical Feng Shui confirmation are starting to emerge. For example, recent scientific research indicates that 28,000 years ago, Neanderthal cavemen (located in present-day Croatia) chose which caves to live in based on three criteria: The caves held the high ground in the area, the surrounding area was easily seen from the entrance of the cave, and the water source was easily accessible. These findings show that even our ancestors were naturally aware of the effects of placement in their environment. Interestingly enough, all three of these criteria are in harmony with the basic principles of Feng Shui, which has evolved and become more sophisticated along with humankind. Thus, Feng Shui is as relevant and beneficial to humankind today as it was 28,000 years ago.
Feng shui is sometimes thought to be the art of placement—understanding how the placement of yourself and objects within a space affects your life in various areas of experience. It is a complex body of knowledge that teaches you how to balance and harmonize with the energies in any given space—be it a home, office, or garden. Its aim is to assure good fortune for the people inhabiting a space. Although regarded by some in the scientific community as a pseudo-science, feng shui has had an impact on the aesthetics of interior design and the architectural layout of living and working spaces both in its native eastern and, more recently, western cultures.  
The "form" in Form School refers to the shape of the environment, such as mountains, rivers, plateaus, buildings, and general surroundings. It considers the five celestial animals (phoenix, green dragon, white tiger, black turtle, and the yellow snake), the yin-yang concept and the traditional five elements (Wu Xing: wood, fire, earth, metal, and water).
×