Most of us have at least one mirror in the bedroom, if not more, but feng shui experts advise against this. “If possible, remove mirrors from the bedroom, as the reflective energy causes excess energy in the room that can be disruptive to sleep,” says Morris. If a mirror in your room is non-negotiable, there are a few possible workarounds, according to Laura Cerrano, a certified feng shui expert and CEO and founder at Feng Shui Manhattan. She suggests covering the mirror at night or placing the mirror so it is not facing the bed.
"Family pictures don't belong in the bedroom," says Whitehurst. "It's the most intimate room in the house and should be reserved for you and your partner." Pictures of children, relatives, and friends may cause you to think about your obligations — and that doesn't allow the mind (or body) to rest. So keep only pictures of you and your spouse or partner in the bedroom, and put other pictures in the dining or family rooms.
The tree loves light, but not direct sunlight, and the air humidity must be of a minimum of 60%, this is why the leaves need to be spayed in case the air in the room is dry. It needs to be watered once per week in order to maintain the soil wet and to remove the excess of the water from the plate. In winter, if the room temperature is below 18º C, the watering needs to be decreased.
...feng shui has become an aspect of interior decorating in the Western world and alleged masters of feng shui now hire themselves out for hefty sums to tell people such as Donald Trump which way his doors and other things should hang. Feng shui has also become another New Age "energy" scam with arrays of metaphysical products...offered for sale to help you improve your health, maximize your potential, and guarantee fulfillment of some fortune cookie philosophy.[85]
Plants respond to music, light and positive energy. When plants are thriving and blooming with beauty, the energy in your home is abundant and flowing. If plants are browning, sagging or dying, the energy is clogged and stagnant. Plants are very telling of the energy of your home, so keeping them in your environment and taking the time to fill your space with positive energy will keep the energy fluid.
In feng shui, chi is what we call life force energy: known to yogis as prana. And the front door is known in feng shui as the “mouth of chi.” In other words, it’s the place where blessings and abundance of all varieties enter both your home and your life. As such, abundant wealth, as well as the consistency of your financial flow, correspond with the appearance and condition of your front door. That’s why a clean, bright red door is an iconic feng shui image: red relates not only to prosperity, but also to vitality, success, and general positivity. But you need not have a red door (unless you want one). Just make sure you love the way it looks, it’s clean, it’s in good repair, it doesn’t squeak or stick, it has full range of motion (nothing is behind it), and the area around it (the entire entryway) is also beautiful and uplifting.
Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
This practice speaks more to everyday habits than layout or décor, but Cerrano stresses that it's nonetheless important: "Making your bed may seem small and insignificant, yet a greater development within your conscious and subconscious minds is evolving. This simple act becomes your first accomplishment of the day and it only requires two minutes of your time. This also creates a mind-set of being organised, which helps reduce stress and increase motivation. It’s also a means of self-respect, because it means you've taken the time to prepare your bed for sleep as your mom or dad may have done during childhood. It's a little slice of self-love."
Any images you hang on your bedroom walls should be inspiring, uplifting, or relaxing. One of the best places to hang such an image is on the wall opposite your bed so that you see it first thing when you wake up and the last thing before you turn off the lights to go to sleep. Don't bring sad or upsetting images into your bedroom, or paintings or photographs that feature just one person: This symbolizes solitude. It's also best to avoid images in which a lake, waterfall, or river is the dominant theme. In other parts of the house, water symbolizes money, but in the bedroom, it may promote financial or relationship losses. 

According to Brophy, clinging to the past disturbs peace in the present. "Keeping objects out of obligation or reluctance to let go is an issue," Brophy says. "I worked with a client who kept a bed frame that her husband used to sleep in with his ex-wife. Every time she looked at that bed frame she was reminded of his past. If you have furnishings or artwork that you fought your family member to obtain, or won in divorce proceedings, evaluate the energetic cost of keeping such things."


Historically, feng shui was widely used to orient buildings—often spiritually significant structures such as tombs, but also dwellings and other structures—in an auspicious manner. Depending on the particular style of feng shui being used, an auspicious site could be determined by reference to local features such as bodies of water, or stars or the compass.
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