Put your books elsewhere. You can keep a few books in your room if you read to put yourself to sleep, but too many books can make you feel overwhelmed in the space. Your bedroom is a place for rest and relaxation, and if you have too many books there, it will be too much like a place for work. Too many books in your resting space can also be overwhelming.[4]
Being thoughtful about how you arrange and use your bedroom is especially important. It's where you sleep, and adequate amounts of quality shut-eye are vital to health and well-being. If you share your home with a spouse or partner, note that a bedroom with good feng shui is thought to strengthen the bond between a couple and attract love. So for the sake of better sleep and a boost to your relationship, consider these tips for improving the feng shui in your bedroom.
The feng shui energy of fruits is the energy of fruition. The use of specific fruits in traditional feng shui applications is often dictated by classifications from ancient texts as being specific symbols of longevity, wealth, prosperity, fertility, etc. Feng shui-wise, attention is often paid to the colors, numbers, as well as the symbolism of specific fruits.  
In feng shui, there are private (yin) spaces, like bedrooms, and public (yang) spaces, like living rooms. A TV in a public space is OK. A television often becomes the focal point, which is fine if that's what you want. But if the intention of the room is, say, to gather the family, then keep the TV in something closed or in a less-than-central spot on the wall, so it doesn't dominate. For a family space, it's also nice to have a soft ottoman in place of a coffee table, so the kids can be in the center of the action.
Small bookshelves are fine. However, if you have bookshelves that are more than six feet (180 cm) tall, then you are better off without the bookshelf. The reason is that the large furniture can give you that invisible pressure that makes you feel oppressed. It’s similar to the feeling you get when you drive right next to a truck or when you’re standing right under a monumental structure.
WHEN May Pang separated from her husband, she wanted to stay in their big house in Rockland County with their two children, but at the same time find a way to start over. Ms. Pang, a music manager, began by getting rid of all of the black laminated furniture in the master bedroom. For a while, she slept on a mattress on the floor of the huge two-story space. (But not the mattress she shared with John Lennon. Ms. Pang, who was famous in the early 1970's as Mr. Lennon's girlfriend before he reunited with Yoko Ono, has stored that mattress in the recording studio in her basement.)
To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.
The posts on the Energy Muse Blog detail our own personal experiences in relation to the topic. This can include, but is not limited to, the use of healing crystals, Feng Shui, chakra healing, meditation, yoga etc. We cannot guarantee that you will have the same experiences. We are not doctors and cannot provide medical advice. None of the information we share should be used as a replacement for seeking medical attention.
Feng shui is a little like astrology. Whether you actually believe in it (or not), learning its inner workings and understanding how it can impact your everyday life is somewhat fascinating. Whether we're talking new moons and planet alignments or bedroom colors and under-bed storage, the link between environment and energy is an abstract concept—but that doesn't mean that its concrete implications in everyday life need to be confusing as well.
Anjie Cho, feng shui expert, interior designer and creator of Holistic Spaces, says, “Your bedroom represents you. Other than maybe your office, you spend a majority of your time in your bedroom, especially if you get six to eight hours of sleep at night.” And that’s when the so-called magic happens: “Because you’re unconscious and in a passive state while you sleep, you’re open to absorbing energy around you more easily,” Cho says.

In feng shui, placing your bed in a “commanding position” is key. This means that your bed isn’t directly in line with the door and that you can see the door in front of you when you’re lying down. The commanding position puts you in a “safe” place and gives you a sense of stability (both physical and metamorphic) because you can spot whatever enters your space. Another important part of positioning your bed is to make sure you have equal room on both sides, so both people are able to get into bed easily. By making space, you create a balance of energy on either side of the bed.
Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]
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