Feng Shui is a term composed of two Chinese words: feng (wind) and shui (water). Wind and water are the two natural elements that flow, move, and circulate everywhere on Earth. They are also the most basic elements required for human survival. Wind — or air — is the breath of life; without it, we would die in moments. And water is the liquid of life; without it, we would die in days. The combined qualities of wind and water determine the climate, which historically has determined our food supply and in turn affects our lifestyle, health, energy, and mood. These two fundamental and flowing elements have always profoundly yet subtly influenced human individuals and societies.

It might be tempting to treat your bedroom as a storage unit, but Cerrano warns against having too much stuff in your in there. In fact, studies conducted by St. Lawrence University in 2015 suggest a correlation between excessive bedroom clutter and sleep disturbances, which could lead to depression and irritability. "Feng shui principles invite you to remove electronics from inside the bedroom: TVs, computers, and cell phones emit the largest amounts of electric and magnetic fields, which could disturb your immune system and sleep," explains Cerrano.
Locate your feng shui money area and take very good care of it. Typically, this is your home office where you manage finances and other work. You will want to include elements like wood, which represent money and wealth. The color blue and pictures of rivers, lakes, and oceans represent water, which nourishes the wood. You can also use mirrors, plants, and small icons that symbolize prosperity.
In feng shui, chi is what we call life force energy: known to yogis as prana. And the front door is known in feng shui as the “mouth of chi.” In other words, it’s the place where blessings and abundance of all varieties enter both your home and your life. As such, abundant wealth, as well as the consistency of your financial flow, correspond with the appearance and condition of your front door. That’s why a clean, bright red door is an iconic feng shui image: red relates not only to prosperity, but also to vitality, success, and general positivity. But you need not have a red door (unless you want one). Just make sure you love the way it looks, it’s clean, it’s in good repair, it doesn’t squeak or stick, it has full range of motion (nothing is behind it), and the area around it (the entire entryway) is also beautiful and uplifting.
Let’s look at the 3 best feng shui bedroom layouts, understand what makes them so, as well as define variations of each good feng shui bedroom layout. Why is this important? Well, because sometimes you might not be able to position the bed exactly as shown in the diagrams below, so it is good to know the extent to which you can modify each good feng shui bedroom layout.
Because your bed is the biggest (hopefully!) and the most important piece of furniture in your bedroom, it is very important to follow a good feng shui bedroom layout. Positioning your bed in the best feng shui spot for your bedroom will create better energy in your space, and you will be the one to benefit from it! How do you find the best feng shui spot in your bedroom? Does it require a lot of guessing work or are there good feng shui bedroom layouts that you can just follow in any bedroom?

So what is feng shui? “Feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is a design system for arranging your surroundings in harmony and balance with the natural world around you,” explains Carol M. Olmstead, FSIA, feng shui master practitioner at Feng Shui for Real Life. “Your surroundings have a powerful effect on what you attract into your life. When the energy around you is blocked, your prosperity, relationships, health, and well-being can be affected. When the energy is balanced, good things naturally flow into your life.”
Many Asians, especially people of Chinese descent, believe it[clarification needed] is important to live a prosperous and healthy life as evident by the popularity of Fu Lu Shou in the Chinese communities. Many of the higher-level forms of feng shui are not easily practiced without having connections in the community or a certain amount of wealth because hiring an expert, altering architecture or design, and moving from place to place requires a significant financial outlay. This leads some people of the lower classes to lose faith in feng shui, saying that it is only a game for the wealthy.[88] Others, however, practice less expensive forms of feng shui, including hanging special (but cheap) mirrors, forks, or woks in doorways to deflect negative energy.[89]
I am moving soon, into our own first home. I came upon your site unexpectedly and have found it to be so informative. Thank you, I have recently lost my StepDad to a horrible act. I lived here on the property with him. I have decided to sell this estate and thankfully have found a cute farm. I have been through so much in such short period of time that now I am just trying to find some peace. Thank you .
Westerners were criticized at the start of the anti-Western Boxer Rebellion for violating the basic principles of feng shui in the construction of railroads and other conspicuous public structures throughout China. However, today, feng shui is practiced not only by the Chinese, but also by Westerners and still criticized by Christians around the world. Many modern Christians have an opinion of feng shui similar to that of their predecessors:[79]

Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world.
When it comes to moving past a failed relationship, your first order of business is cutting the cord to your last one. “We use the word ‘energy cord,’” Cerrano says. “If you have all this stuff from [a past relationship] scattered through your home, it’s energetically creating a cord to that person. When you're done with a relationship, it’s recommended that, at your own pace, you release the things that aren’t beneficial anymore.”

A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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