Speaking from personal experience back in my college days, there are many ways to hurt yourself if your bedroom is filled with clutter. You can trip on something. You can step on your own clutter. Worse, you can stub your toe. The pain associated with that can wake you fully and can completely disrupt your sleeping cycle. Maybe you can relate to this funny Vine video that shows “how it really feels when you stub your pinky toe”:
If you look for it, Benko says, "symbolism is constantly bombarding us on an everyday basis. From literature to traffic signage to movies, we're always being guided by symbolism. In our homes, it's enhanced even more, because we are creating these intimate environments that most often represent our fears and challenges." Often, we unwittingly reinforce the challenges in our lives by having their symbols in our space.
When it comes to getting a good night's sleep, we'll readily admit that there are very few things we won't try. From lowering our thermostats to upgrading our mattresses, we've spilled a lot of ink on strategies for getting solid shut-eye. But as it turns out, optimizing our beds' feng shui could be one of the simpler ways of ensuring we get a restful night's sleep.
Plants respond to music, light and positive energy. When plants are thriving and blooming with beauty, the energy in your home is abundant and flowing. If plants are browning, sagging or dying, the energy is clogged and stagnant. Plants are very telling of the energy of your home, so keeping them in your environment and taking the time to fill your space with positive energy will keep the energy fluid.
The number 4 symbolizes stability and a strong foundation, and it represents the four directions and the four seasons. The number 4 is sometimes considered unlucky in Chinese Feng Shui because it sounds like the word "death" in certain Chinese dialects, but it doesn’t have this association for Western cultures. If you have a number four in your address and you are from a country other than China, instead of worrying whether the number four is unlucky, try thinking of four as sounding like the word "more."
Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.
Energy flows through a room like water in a stream — swiftly through the deepest channels, more slowly along the bank, and not at all in that pile of junk in the corner. Plan your room's layout with the eye of a feng shui practitioner: eliminate stagnant areas like half-completed projects or piles of unfolded laundry, make sure closets aren't overcrowded, and keep the passageways around your room easy to navigate and free from clutter to let the chi flow.

Most of us have televisions in our bedroom. It happens. If you have trouble sleeping it or even if you don’t, it is a good idea to cover the television when not in use. The active energy of the television as well as the electronic aspect of it may be disruptive to the type of calming quiet energy more conducive to sleep and bedrooms. My suggestion, find a beautiful scarf or fabric and just toss it over the television!
An excellent way to stimulate chi energy for your finances or career is to add a water fountain in your home office or inside the entrance of your home. Make sure the fountain flows into your home or office and never towards the door. You can opt for an aquarium if you prefer. Place it in the North sector of your home or office to stimulate the career sector or in the Southeast to activate the wealth sector. Have at least 8 red fish and 1 black fish, the lucky number of fish, for attracting auspicious chi energy.
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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