Always be mindful of the energy in your home and how it influences your wellbeing. Make a habit of paying close attention to the so-called feng shui "trinity" that is deeply connected to your health: your bedroom, your bathroom, and your kitchen. Nothing is static in the world of energy, so you must remain mindful of their condition and effects. Embrace and promote the right energies for you to keep your home healthy and happy.
A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."
Partly because of the Cultural Revolution, in today's mainland China less than one-third of the population believe in feng shui, and the proportion of believers among young urban Chinese is said to be much lower[73] Learning feng shui is still somewhat considered taboo in today's China.[74][75][76] Nevertheless, it is reported that feng shui has gained adherents among Communist Party officials according to a BBC Chinese news commentary in 2006,[77] and since the beginning of Chinese economic reforms the number of feng shui practitioners is increasing. A number of Chinese academics permitted to research on the subject of feng shui are anthropologists or architects by profession, studying the history of feng shui or historical feng shui theories behind the design of heritage buildings, such as Cao Dafeng, the Vice-President of Fudan University,[78] and Liu Shenghuan of Tongji University.
Decluttering must be thorough—simply hiding your stuff won’t cut it. Items under the furniture, overloaded bookcases and closets, and outdated or broken items all affect chi flow. It’s time to clear out closets, the space under the bed and all cabinets and shelves. Keep only the items you love—or ones that have special meaning—and discard or donate the old and unused.
The only stress I really have IS the insomnia. However, it seems to be resolving a bit at a time. I thought I read that it was bad to have your feet facing the area of the toilet, especially the bathroom door. My feet face a bit to the side of the door, but I can see part of the bed from the bathroom. I’m glad I was mistaken on the wall! Thank you!
The feng shui energy of fruits is the energy of fruition. The use of specific fruits in traditional feng shui applications is often dictated by classifications from ancient texts as being specific symbols of longevity, wealth, prosperity, fertility, etc. Feng shui-wise, attention is often paid to the colors, numbers, as well as the symbolism of specific fruits.  
Different schools of feng shui have opposing views on mirrors in the bedroom, but Cho says having round or oval mirrors actually symbolize continuity in a relationship and helps with the flow of chi in the room. Many feng shui experts advise against having a mirror directly in front of your bed because it may cause infidelity in a relationship, and it might also be jarring to see your reflection if you wake up in the middle of the night. Instead, you can position a full-length mirror away from your bed, so that you can see a reflection of the door and who’s entering. Or, stash that looking glass on the inside of your closet door.
Any images you hang on your bedroom walls should be inspiring, uplifting, or relaxing. One of the best places to hang such an image is on the wall opposite your bed so that you see it first thing when you wake up and the last thing before you turn off the lights to go to sleep. Don't bring sad or upsetting images into your bedroom, or paintings or photographs that feature just one person: This symbolizes solitude. It's also best to avoid images in which a lake, waterfall, or river is the dominant theme. In other parts of the house, water symbolizes money, but in the bedroom, it may promote financial or relationship losses. 
In feng shui, placing your bed in a “commanding position” is key. This means that your bed isn’t directly in line with the door and that you can see the door in front of you when you’re lying down. The commanding position puts you in a “safe” place and gives you a sense of stability (both physical and metamorphic) because you can spot whatever enters your space. Another important part of positioning your bed is to make sure you have equal room on both sides, so both people are able to get into bed easily. By making space, you create a balance of energy on either side of the bed.
Chi is energy. It is the constantly moving and changing life force that we feel around us making us feel either good or bad in a certain location. Chi can accumulate in the objects around you. In your home or office, the chi will flow in through the door and out through the windows. The goal of Feng Shui improvements (or "cures") is to keep the chi flowing gently throughout your environment rather than running straight through it. Chi can have a negative effect on your surroundings when it gets stuck or blocked.
The ancient Chinese method of Feng Shui helps us to balance our homes and create happier, more successful lives, room by room. We often turn our attention to the bedroom, the sanctuary where we can rest and recharge. Having the proper Feng Shui in the bedroom can help your romantic life as well as your ability to rest and to feel in control. You have to know how to keep the chi flowing, and how to deflect any negative energy that may enter your room -- and your life.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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