Everyone appreciates the benefits of beautiful, comfortable living environments; America’s billion-dollar interior decorating industry attests to this fact. However, Feng Shui takes the approach that your surroundings affect not just your level of material comfort but also your physical and mental health, your relationships, and your worldly success.

Feng Shui is rooted in a holistic worldview. It sees all things and creatures as part of a natural order, a vast environment that is alive and in flux, ever moving and changing. Each thing in this natural order is equally alive and has an energetic value or component. So everything — plants, animals, people, and things — exists in a vast landscape that swirls with vital energy. The same energy that flows through the world flows through you as well. In fact, according to this view, your essence — the part of you that makes you alive, unique, and vital — is this energy. And your body is the vehicle or environment in which this essence flows.


Feng shui is sometimes thought to be the art of placement—understanding how the placement of yourself and objects within a space affects your life in various areas of experience. It is a complex body of knowledge that teaches you how to balance and harmonize with the energies in any given space—be it a home, office, or garden. Its aim is to assure good fortune for the people inhabiting a space. Although regarded by some in the scientific community as a pseudo-science, feng shui has had an impact on the aesthetics of interior design and the architectural layout of living and working spaces both in its native eastern and, more recently, western cultures.  
For example, when I think of a lifelong love partnership, I can come up with many images, none of them being the Mandarin ducks (the traditional feng shui representation of love & marriage). This is because I have no cultural or emotional connections to this image. However, for many Chinese people, the image of Mandarin ducks will genuinely speak of devoted love because there is strong cultural lore connected to this image. This means that approaching feng shui in an intelligent way and with a good dose of healthy discrimination is the cornerstone of successful feng shui work.

Traditional, or classical feng shui schools, have many symbols used for various purposes. Some feng shui symbols are well known, such as the Mandarin Ducks for love and marriage, the Tortoise for protection and stability, or the Koi Fish for abundance. Some feng shui symbols, such as Bats or Chi Lins, are less known. This list of feng shui symbols should help you. There is a subtle line between the use of the words "feng shui symbols" and "feng shui cures", as symbols are used as feng shui cures. Be sure to read all about feng shui cures in order to understand more about shifting the energy with feng shui.
By now, you’re probably getting a pretty good idea that in feng shui, water equals wealth. As such, a fountain – particularly a round one that flows equally in all directions – is a powerful wealth charm and affirmation of constantly flowing finances. A fountain is particularly wonderful near the front door, indoors or out. (I have one similar to this in my office and I really like it. It’s like wind chimes and a fountain all in one.)
The most common feng shui use of the butterfly symbol is as a feng shui cure for love and romance, probably because love is the most transformative feeling that makes you feel like flying. The additional element of using the feng shui symbol of butterflies as a feng shui love cure is the element of freedom to choose among a number of suitors. The butterfly symbol is one of the best feng shui love cures for single people. 

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Feng Shui (pronounced “fung shway”) examines how the placement of things and objects within it affect the energy flow in your living environment, and how these objects interact with and influence your personal energy flow. Your personal energy flow affects how you think and act, which in turn affects how well you perform and succeed in your personal and professional life. Feng Shui affects you every moment of the day — whether you’re aware of it or not.
Last but not least, do a space clearing. Our homes and environments retain the energetic imprint of those that inhabit the spaces. It is always good to just take a little time and burn off the old energy to welcome fresh and new chi. My favorite methods of space clearing are the following: burn palo santo, smudge with white sage or spraying natural orange essential oil with water. Palo santo is light and great for everyday use. White sage is heavier for the heavy duty space clearing. And the orange oil is great if you also need something to uplift your mood. Whatever you use, make sure to imagine the space being filled with positive energy and your dreams for the future.
Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!
SelfBuild Ireland specialises in helping people either selfbuild or improve their home via our exhibitions, magazines and online resources. Selfbuild is designed to cut through the noise and deliver what matters, whether that be innovative new ideas, services, new products, projects or the basics in building a dream home. Let Selfbuild be your guide.
Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world.
Curb appeal isn't just for selling a home. Clean up the yard and dispose of limbs, leaves, and other debris. Make sure pathways and walkways to the front door are clean and accessible. Repeat for all other entryways into your home. Trim overgrown shrubbery or replace older ones that are too big. If a tree is directly in front of a door, counter it with a wind chime.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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