Sha Chi is anything unpleasant that brings negative energy: a smelly pile of dirty laundry, harsh overhead lighting, clutter, dirt, or unclean bed linens. Charge your phone or tablet elsewhere to eliminate unwanted magnetic radiation, and wake up to a soundless (no tick tock!) clock with a gradual alarm like this one. Rid your room of anything dangerous, such as a rickety ceiling fan or a shelf with heavy objects mounted over your head.
While some traditional Chinese feng shui money cures such as the three legged toad, the Dragon Turtle, the Gem Tree or the Lucky Cat might not appeal to your taste (I know I do not use them!); there are still plenty of popular and powerful feng shui for wealth cures that you might like. Look into the Lucky Bamboo, the Wealth Ship or the Money Tree, to name just a few, and see if your money area can benefit from their energy.
If there are areas or objects in your home that are collecting dust, it may symbolize areas of your life that are stagnant and ignored. If you don’t need that object, maybe it’s time to donate it. And if there’s a room you haven’t stepped foot in, maybe it’s time to peek inside. It can be as simple as taking the time to move things around to stir up some good energy.
This applies mostly to adults and not students, because the adults are the ones who get more pressure from work due to the need to support the family and the kids. The easy cure to this is to remove the desk or other furnitures that remind you of work. Here’s a tip I got from Hipster Feng Shui. If you live in a small space, you can try dividing your work area and your bed with a curtain.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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