To be more specific, the dragon turtle is used to improve social relationships and prevent unnecessary dramas. Dragon turtle can also help with career advancements and is especially helpful those who work in the fields of public relations, sales, and other jobs that require lots socializing. To use the dragon turtle with these purposes, place it on your office desk with its head facing outward.
To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.
To ensure the constant flow of good energy throughout the home, wind (air) and light must move as well. You’ve decluttered your home in step one, making it easier for energy to flow. Now open the windows to increase air flow. Maximize light movement by keeping all glass, mirrors and windows clean. Have a dark corner or space that needs a little brightening? Add a lamp to illuminate the spot, or place a mirror to reflect light from a different spot.
General neglect. Some people's dining rooms are a dumping ground for mail, kids' stuff—just a mess that never gets cleared. And in some homes the room is totally ignored; no one ever sets foot in there. This depletes its energy, which makes it even less appealing. If you don't often use the room for meals, activate it in another way. Put a plant there so you're forced to come in and water it. Or bring your laptop in and use the space as an office.
If you have anything hanging right above your bed, such as a chandelier, you will get that same feeling of discomfort because you may not feel 100% safe, and the effects are worse if it is hanging right above your head. The cure is to remove that furniture and place it somewhere else, like right above a dining table, where people will not reside right under it.
Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
Feng Shui is the ancient Chinese system of natural laws which are supposed to govern the spatial arrangement orientation of your furniture and décor in relation to the flow of energy (Chi). The word ‘feng’ is Chinese for wind, and the word ‘shui’ is Chinese for water – together these symbolise the flow of life that one should aspire to have in one’s home.
Use real fountains in and out of the home, no matter how small, as a powerful feng shui cure. This will attract wealth energy and fresh Chi. You can also use symbols that represent fountains, such as images of flowing water like waterfalls, oceans, and rivers. The water images that have plenty of foam and open views are especially powerful in the feng shui wealth applications.
EDGEWATER, a modest slip of a city beside the Hudson -- it's three miles long and just three-quarters of a mile wide -- has enjoyed a growth spurt over the last 15 years, gaining fine dining establishments and high-class shops, and doubling its population to nearly 10,000. Now, a developer has decided that Edgewater is ready for a Manhattan-style condominium tower.
The Five Elements or Forces (wu xing) – which, according to the Chinese, are metal, earth, fire, water, and wood – are first mentioned in Chinese literature in a chapter of the classic Book of History. They play a very important part in Chinese thought: ‘elements’ meaning generally not so much the actual substances as the forces essential to human life.[32] Earth is a buffer, or an equilibrium achieved when the polarities cancel each other.[citation needed] While the goal of Chinese medicine is to balance yin and yang in the body, the goal of feng shui has been described as aligning a city, site, building, or object with yin-yang force fields.[33]
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