2. Position your bed. In feng shui, the commanding position for your bed is as far away from the door as possible while still allowing you to keep an eye on the room’s entrance. This allows for a feeling of safety and protection while you rest. Try not to position your bed under the lower angle of a pitched ceiling or a ceiling fan. These features have a “depressing” energy that will literally push you down while you sleep. Also, be sure to avoid positioning your bed under a window because it lacks the symbolic support and protection of a solid wall. Headboards, especially those made of solid wood, are considered good feng shui because they provide the added strength and support you need behind your head.
Being thoughtful about how you arrange and use your bedroom is especially important. It's where you sleep, and adequate amounts of quality shut-eye are vital to health and well-being. If you share your home with a spouse or partner, note that a bedroom with good feng shui is thought to strengthen the bond between a couple and attract love. So for the sake of better sleep and a boost to your relationship, consider these tips for improving the feng shui in your bedroom.
When choosing bedroom furniture, opting for pairs can be especially harmonizing. "Two nightstands (one on each side of the bed) is recommended" for optimal feng shui, explains Cerrano. "They symbolize balance and equality in Western feng shui practices." If the layout of your bedroom doesn't allow equal space for this particular arrangement, one side table will do, reassures Cerrano.
Fish bowl location is a loaded question. Some quick facts: it depends on its size. As for living areas, its not suitable for bedroom but suitable for bedroom. As for Bagua, anywhere that needs MORE wood and water elements is suitable (determined by various factors, such as amount of living space in that area of the home). Southeast and East is wood, so they are suitable there (but again, not in kitchen or bedroom). Also, don’t place the fish bowl on the “ghost line” – https://fengshuinexus.com/blog/feng-shui-rules-related-to-supernatural/
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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