Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]
According to Brophy, clinging to the past disturbs peace in the present. "Keeping objects out of obligation or reluctance to let go is an issue," Brophy says. "I worked with a client who kept a bed frame that her husband used to sleep in with his ex-wife. Every time she looked at that bed frame she was reminded of his past. If you have furnishings or artwork that you fought your family member to obtain, or won in divorce proceedings, evaluate the energetic cost of keeping such things."
4. Ventilate and brighten, in other words encourage good quality air to circulate and let lots of light into your house. These two elements are essential for good chi. Open bedroom windows first thing in the morning to allow moisture to escape (taking care not to leave ground floor rooms unattended for security reasons). And once you’ve exhausted all possible avenues to let in natural light, consider using full-spectrum lighting to further brighten up a space.
6. Find beauty in your accessories. In your bedroom, feng shui suggests hanging your favorite pieces of art on the wall opposite your bed. This way it’s the last thing you see before you go to sleep and the first thing you see when you wake up. Your artwork should be something that makes you feel joyful and inspired. If your direct view from the bed is your bathroom or messy closet, screen those views with curtains or simply by closing the door. Another item you don’t want to place opposite, next to, or over your bed is a mirror. In addition to bouncing too much energy around the room to allow for a good nights rest, these reflective surfaces are thought to magnify problems and worries.
Smell: I advise using essential oils in an ultrasonic diffuser or in a candle diffuser (most wax candles these days are packed with synthetic fragrances). Limit it to a few drops of oil in diluted in water, and don't leave them diffusing for more than an hour or two. They are potent! I love lavender and jasmine oils for a calming smell before bed. If I have a cough, I'll go with ravintsara or eucalyptus. Looking to amp up the sexual energy? Check out cinnamon, ylang-ylang, and best of all, winter savory.
As you'd probably expect, your headboard and bed frame play a significant role in optimizing the feng shui of your bedroom, according to Cerrano. Choose "a solid wooden headboard and frame," she suggests. This "is a common suggestion in Western feng shui because the element of wood relates to the symbolic nature of supporting your body and energy when sleeping," she explains.
Who has not heard of Feng Shui symbols like chinese dragon, laughing buddha or phoenix  ? Some of the feng shui symbols are well known like mandarin ducks or the lucky bamboo. Whether you use feng shui symbols as gift or as an expression of good wishes you must know where to place it. Otherwise they cannot fullfill the great promise of their meaning. 
Feng shui for wealth is one of the most popular applications of feng shui.  The focus on attracting material wealth is actually one of the reasons feng shui became so popular in the West, since we’ve heard about many business tycoons using feng shui for more profits and stronger financial security. Of course, there is much more to feng shui than its wealth building appeal! You can use feng shui to create a better quality of life, improve your health, attract more harmony to your relationships, help build a successful career, etc.
Feng shui Fu Dogs, or Imperial Guardian Lions, is a strong feng shui protection symbol. Fu Dogs were traditionally placed in front of Imperial palaces, temples, and government offices. Fu Dogs were also a traditional feng shui symbol of family wealth and social status and were placed in front of wealthy homes. Fu Dogs are usually displayed as a couple. 
Nature is the ultimate manifestation of unlimited wealth and abundance, so replicating the lush energy of nature in your home will help you attract the same quality of energy. Money plant or not, lucky bamboo or not, know that decorating your home with lush, verdant happy plants in good looking, solid pots is an excellent feng shui wealth magnet. The East, the Southeast, and the South areas are the most greenery loving feng shui areas in your home.
Similar to meditation, the practice of feng shui is deeply steeped in mindfulness, in slowing down and noticing the details in your life so that you can truly experience the present moment. The words "feng shui" are Chinese and translate to "wind" and "water." Wind is our breath, and humans are almost 60 percent water. Wind and water are vital elements for life, as is feng shui! Historically, feng shui has roots in Taoism and Buddhism. However, elements of feng shui are palpable in every culture across time. For instance, these days we can all feel the difference between a New York City apartment and a quiet hidden cabin in the forest, and we understand that our surroundings greatly affect our energy.
When it comes to accessorizing, Cerrano encourages choosing items you love in order to optimize the energy of your bedroom. "Accent pillows, a throw blanket, paired with a comforter can all help enhance the energy through subtle colors, patterns, and designs," she suggests. "What you choose would all depend on the overall atmosphere you are aiming to create along with what is already established within that room." Follow your gut and decorate with textiles that bring you joy.
Traditional feng shui relies upon the compass to give accurate readings.[61][62] However, critics point out that the compass degrees are often inaccurate as fluctuations caused by solar winds have the ability to greatly disturb the electromagnetic field of the earth.[63] Determining a property or site location based upon Magnetic North will result in inaccuracies because true magnetic north fluctuates.[64]
It's important to balance the yin and yang in the bedroom, and one way to do that is by mixing textures, says Cerrano. Yin (the feminine energy) is evident in soft textures like a plush rug or soft blanket and "brings in that mothering, nurturing energy and emotion," she explains. The masculine yang energy, on the other hand, can be found in hard wood floors, for example. However, men can have feminine energies and vice versa, which is why Cerrano suggests balancing hard and soft textures in the bedroom. Los agrees: “Too many bedrooms now are too yang."
The Mystic Knot is one of the most often used symbols in feng shui. Being a combination of six times the infinity symbol, this feng shui knot symbolizes a long and happy life full of good fortune. Mystic knot is sometimes referred to as the endless knot​ because it looks like it swallows its own tail. In Buddhism, the mystic knot is one of the 8 magical auspicious objects. 
A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."
Astrid Madsen is the editor of SelfBuild & Improve Your Home magazine. She previously held the same role in an Irish trade publication, before that she worked at the National Standards Authority of Ireland. She graduated with a BA in Urban Studies from Columbia University in New York and holds an MBA from the Instituto de Estudios Bursatiles in Madrid. France of origin, she now lives in Portarlington, County Laois, where she's taken on the task of renovating a listed building! Email [email protected]
Find out your Kua number and your lucky directions so that you can be energized by good energy from your best or lucky feng shui directions. Use these as a guide to adjust the position of things like your bed, your desk, or the seating in your dining area. For example, if your Kua number is 1, it is best to face one of the following directions: Southeast, East, South, or North.
To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.

Not all bedrooms are ideal candidates for feng shui layouts. Most American homes weren't built with any feng shui considerations, so the challenges are always present when trying to create an auspicious feng shui bedroom layout and design. This is especially true of small bedrooms. Space is a premium in small bedrooms. This includes wall space that's often broken up by doors and windows.


As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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