Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
You are in complete control of the lights in your bedroom. However, you have little or no control of the lights outside of your home. That is why you need blinds and curtains that can completely block out the light from the outside. If your current blinds or curtains have light shining through the cracks at night, it may be worthy to invest in double layered curtains to improve your sleep sleep.

When you hear about untimely muggings, rapes, accidents and deaths on news you must remember that the victim was at the wrong place at the wrong time. When you learn about feng shui numbers you can reduce the occurrence of accidents and misfortunes in your life. Also you must know how to activate good stars that cause financial windfalls, unexpected good news or opportunities, promotion at work, a chance meeting that brings happiness.


1. Use calming colors. The practitioners of feng shui recommend warm, rich earth tones such as copper, coral, cream, and cocoa for creating a cozy and welcoming atmosphere. Using soft, natural colors such as light blues, greens, and lavenders also lead to a quiet, tranquil, and inviting energy in your bedroom. The addition of bright pinks and reds can increase the romance in a relationship; however, limit these colors to accents in the form of pillows, throws, or decorative pieces. Use a softer pinks for your bedding or wall color. Otherwise, it can be too overwhelming.
General neglect. Some people's dining rooms are a dumping ground for mail, kids' stuff—just a mess that never gets cleared. And in some homes the room is totally ignored; no one ever sets foot in there. This depletes its energy, which makes it even less appealing. If you don't often use the room for meals, activate it in another way. Put a plant there so you're forced to come in and water it. Or bring your laptop in and use the space as an office.

If the bedroom is a place for rest and romance, then the items in that room should reflect that, says Tisha Morris, a certified feng shui consultant. “The energy in your home has a direct influence on you with each room representing a different aspect of self. The bedroom should only contain those items related to sleep, relaxation, and your relationship with your partner or yourself," says Morris.
The main difference between the practices of feng shui (or "vastu" in the Hindu culture) and Western traditions is a belief that we as humans are connected to the spaces we inhabit. Believers in feng shui see sacred purposes and mystical meanings behind design -- not just artistically appealing buildings or superficially pretty surroundings. They view the world in terms of cosmic energy.
When your bedroom is on top of a garage, you sleep can be disrupted by a variety of factors, including the smell of car exhaust, noise from garage door movements, insects that creeps into your bedroom, and warmer bedroom temperatures. If these four factors are non-existent, your bedroom’s feng shui location should be fine. I wrote a full article about it, and you can read it here.
7. Let there be light. When lighting your bedroom, flexibility is key. You want lots of natural light during the day, soft light in the evening, and darkness while you sleep. Exposure to sunlight first thing in the morning influences your serotonin levels and can affect you for the rest of the day. When choosing your light, make sure to provide a variety of sources, include overhead, table, and wall lighting.
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Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.
The number 4 symbolizes stability and a strong foundation, and it represents the four directions and the four seasons. The number 4 is sometimes considered unlucky in Chinese Feng Shui because it sounds like the word "death" in certain Chinese dialects, but it doesn’t have this association for Western cultures. If you have a number four in your address and you are from a country other than China, instead of worrying whether the number four is unlucky, try thinking of four as sounding like the word "more."
Pretending your space has good energy by hanging chimes and crystals just does not work; it is a false (and naive) cover up. So, focus on creating a genuinely strong, healthy and solid foundation, and then apply the wealth and money feng shui tips and cures that truly speak to you. Always choose the wealth feng shui cures that make sense in your home or office; a three legged frog in a modern house may look absolutely ridiculous (unless it has deep meaning to you); and it will sure not work to attract wealth.
Working with your back to a door puts you in a compromising position, even if you don’t realize it right now. If you reposition your desk and work facing a door, you may be surprised to feel how much more powerful that position is in space. If your desk is positioned so that your back has to be to a door, or if there is no way to change the desk position, put a mirror above your desk or a reflective surface on your desk that enables you to see the door in the reflection. In essence, no one can “sneak up on you” when you face a door or can see it.
Refrain from positioning your bed directly under a beam. A beam may create feelings of pressure that can disrupt your sleep. If you have no other options, cover the beam with fabric or hang 2 bamboo flutes from the beam with the mouthpieces pointed downward. This will help block some of the unwanted energy coming from above the bed. The idea is that you don't want to feel threatened in your sleep.
Interesting bits of historical Feng Shui confirmation are starting to emerge. For example, recent scientific research indicates that 28,000 years ago, Neanderthal cavemen (located in present-day Croatia) chose which caves to live in based on three criteria: The caves held the high ground in the area, the surrounding area was easily seen from the entrance of the cave, and the water source was easily accessible. These findings show that even our ancestors were naturally aware of the effects of placement in their environment. Interestingly enough, all three of these criteria are in harmony with the basic principles of Feng Shui, which has evolved and become more sophisticated along with humankind. Thus, Feng Shui is as relevant and beneficial to humankind today as it was 28,000 years ago.

The main tools used in feng sui are the compass and the bagua. The bagua, or the energy map, is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the I Ching, the ancient oracle on which feng shui is based. The Compass , or Luo-Pan, is used to access the deeper information of a building. It consists of bands of concentric rings arranged around the magnetic needle.
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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