Victorian-era commentators on feng shui were generally ethnocentric, and as such skeptical and derogatory of what they knew of feng shui.[66] In 1896, at a meeting of the Educational Association of China, Rev. P.W. Pitcher railed at the "rottenness of the whole scheme of Chinese architecture," and urged fellow missionaries "to erect unabashedly Western edifices of several stories and with towering spires in order to destroy nonsense about fung-shuy".[67]
“When it comes to choosing bedding, go with something that feels good and that you’re drawn to,” Cho says. “I recommend getting organic cotton sheets whenever possible because they’re toxin-free and breathable. No one sleeps well if they’re too hot or too cold,” Cho says. Softness matters, too. The general rule is that the higher the thread count, the softer the sheets. The National Sleep Foundation recommends going with a thread count between 200 and 400. (Though, in the summer, you’ll want the thread count to be on the lower end to help with airflow.)
Historically, feng shui was widely used to orient buildings—often spiritually significant structures such as tombs, but also dwellings and other structures—in an auspicious manner. Depending on the particular style of feng shui being used, an auspicious site could be determined by reference to local features such as bodies of water, or stars or the compass.
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