The practice and application of feng shui provides ways to harmonize every aspect of your life -- each object, color, and material in your environment is arranged to increase the flow of good energy and decrease conflict and stress. The physical changes to a space are pragmatic; the spiritual effects of those changes are personal, uplifting, and dynamic.

A bedroom is no place for an office. A creative corner, maybe, but a technology-filled, deadline-driven, endless to-do list office? A constant reminder of your unread inbox does not cultivate rest or intimacy. Consider a mobile office that partners a laptop with your dining room table (and attractive storage for all your supplies) before you resort to a bedroom office.


It’s time to start a new Pinterest board. According to feng shui principles, Cho recommends opting for a sturdy headboard, preferably a wooden one, with no bars or holes on it. “The headboard keeps you connected with your partner and stabilizes you in bed. Not having a headboard makes your relationship feel more temporary,” Cho says. And if you’re single, a sturdy headboard can help attract a strong and secure relationship, proponents believe. If buying a new headboard isn’t in your budget right now, some feng shui experts suggest adding two large pillows behind your sleeping pillows. This makes for a comfortable and soft DIY “headboard” in the meantime. But Cho warns, “It’s better to have a headboard if at all possible. If you can’t afford one, then you can try the pillows but it’s not a substitute for a solid headboard.”
The first step to creating a calm, relaxed environment is making sure your surroundings are clean and clutter-free. Do a deep clean and pull everything out of your closet, vacuum under the bed, and force yourself to get rid of stuff you don't love. "Evaluate what's around you and allow yourself to streamline," Brophy says. "If you have clothes you know you'll never wear again, give them to charity. Don't let them take up your energy."
Imperial palaces and cities were planned according to feng shui, which became a principle of classical Chinese architecture. Beijing's Forbidden City is an example. A spectacular complex of palaces, administrative buildings, and temples arranged around a series of courtyards, the Forbidden City was the capital of China during the Ming and Qing dynasties.
Finally, the health and vitality of your houseplants mirrors the health and vitality of everything in your life, including your finances. This means that if one of your houseplants is struggling, do your best to revive it, and if you can’t seem to do so after a reasonable length of time, give it to one of your houseplant whisperer friends, or release it with love to a compost bin (trust me, it’s best for both you and the plant). And if you seem to have trouble with houseplants generally, you might try lucky bamboo. All you have to do to keep it happy is keep it in bright, indirect light and change the water every week or two. (Here are some hints and tips for keeping lucky bamboo extra healthy.)

Aim for equality. Try to have equal space on either side of your bed and other furniture. A person should be able to walk around as easily around one side of the room as the other, within reason. Of course, a piece of furniture may add some inequality, but in general, you should avoid letting most of the stuff in the bedroom clutter over to one side, or you'll create discord in your most important room.
Speaking from personal experience back in my college days, there are many ways to hurt yourself if your bedroom is filled with clutter. You can trip on something. You can step on your own clutter. Worse, you can stub your toe. The pain associated with that can wake you fully and can completely disrupt your sleeping cycle. Maybe you can relate to this funny Vine video that shows “how it really feels when you stub your pinky toe”:

The diagrams are also linked with the sifang (four directions) method of divination used during the Shang dynasty.[37] The sifang is much older, however. It was used at Niuheliang, and figured large in Hongshan culture's astronomy. And it is this area of China that is linked to Yellow Emperor (Huangdi) who allegedly invented the south-pointing spoon (see compass).[38]
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
×