When it comes to getting a good night's sleep, we'll readily admit that there are very few things we won't try. From lowering our thermostats to upgrading our mattresses, we've spilled a lot of ink on strategies for getting solid shut-eye. But as it turns out, optimizing our beds' feng shui could be one of the simpler ways of ensuring we get a restful night's sleep.

When you see the homes of wealthy people, the number one thing that you actually see is open space. An abundance of open space. Strange, no? Rarely do you see wealthy houses full to the brim with all sorts of stuff. It is the luxury of open space and plenty of breathing room that attracts more wealth energy. In feng shui terms this basically means there is open space to allow more and to enjoy more. To create more, explore more and be more.


Since ancient times, the wise Chinese believed that amethyst, a purple crystal, can facilitate the professional relationships with the superiors, as well as with the field experts. It is recommended to place a tree made out of amethyst stones in the office, where it can balance the energies between colleagues and leaders, which, at the right time, will lead to a promotion.
Though some claim that TV helps them sleep, the light and sound from the TV are actually causing us to stay awake longer than needed. The light from the TV is a form of artificial light that has the tendency to keep us awake by delaying the release of sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin.  Further, whatever show or movie that you’re watching can also invoke strong emotions that’ll keep you awake longer than usual.
To ensure the constant flow of good energy throughout the home, wind (air) and light must move as well. You’ve decluttered your home in step one, making it easier for energy to flow. Now open the windows to increase air flow. Maximize light movement by keeping all glass, mirrors and windows clean. Have a dark corner or space that needs a little brightening? Add a lamp to illuminate the spot, or place a mirror to reflect light from a different spot.
If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
Design tweaks include reducing the numbers of mirrors on the wall, and positioning beds away from facing the door—both concessions to feng shui (the former bounces energy, creating restlessness; the latter is the position of the dead). — Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Chinese Tourists Are Changing the Travel Landscape," 2 Nov. 2018 My own perception of feng shui revolts against the number of doors—that many egress routes can’t be restful. — Alexandra Lange, Curbed, "A museum grows in Houston," 1 Nov. 2018 The life coach starts with a decluttering exercise followed by a feng shui session before ending with the blessing. — Katie Jackson, Fox News, "What is a house blessing and should you have one?," 1 Mar. 2017 The manicured grounds, which include two outdoor fireplaces, fountain features and a koi pond, were done by landscape architect Mark Rios and feng shui consultant David Cho. — Neal J. Leitereg, latimes.com, "'West Wing' star Rob Lowe seeks $47 million for empty nest in Montecito," 30 June 2018 More from Mansion The Lowes bought the land in 2005, records show, and built the home from scratch, hiring a feng shui master to help create a peaceful atmosphere. — Katherine Clarke, WSJ, "Rob Lowe Asks $47 Million for California Estate," 22 June 2018 Most of the companies still using their downtown outposts have figured out that feng shui. — Ally Marotti, chicagotribune.com, "Suburban companies battle tech giants for talent. Downtown office spaces are their secret weapon.," 21 June 2018 La Volpe was impressed with Camacho’s expertise in history and feng shui, the Chinese practice of harmonizing human surroundings with the natural world. — Raúl Vilchis, New York Times, "Mexico Wages a Psychological Battle Against Its World Cup Demons," 6 June 2018 The grand archway on Nelson Street is said to have been built according to the principles of feng shui, thus bringing good luck. — The Economist, "Europe’s oldest Chinatown fights for survival," 31 May 2018
The Golden Rooster or the Red Rooster is a lucky element for those who want to obtain a promotion. On the other hand, it is beneficial when placed in the office because it balances the energies, it improves communication and it helps to establish new contacts and relationships. Chinese people like to decorate it with lucky coins and to place it in the north or south side of the office.

The second best feng shui bedroom layout has the door to the side but the bed is still further away from the door, has a solid wall behind it and good grounding energy on both sides. Notice the biggest piece of furniture is again balancing the energy well (visualize a triangle between the two nightstands and the chest of drawers, this shows you the best furniture layout for a bedroom).


Interesting bits of historical Feng Shui confirmation are starting to emerge. For example, recent scientific research indicates that 28,000 years ago, Neanderthal cavemen (located in present-day Croatia) chose which caves to live in based on three criteria: The caves held the high ground in the area, the surrounding area was easily seen from the entrance of the cave, and the water source was easily accessible. These findings show that even our ancestors were naturally aware of the effects of placement in their environment. Interestingly enough, all three of these criteria are in harmony with the basic principles of Feng Shui, which has evolved and become more sophisticated along with humankind. Thus, Feng Shui is as relevant and beneficial to humankind today as it was 28,000 years ago.
If you have even one leak – anywhere in or around your house – stop reading this blog post and fix it now. In feng shui – and in life – water is wealth: a water leak is both literally and figuratively a leak of precious resources. That’s why fixing leaks will help you save and retain money, rather than watching it flow out just as soon as it flows in.

The three deities should be placed side by side like the image shown above. Shou should be on the left of the viewer, Lu in the middle, and Fu on the far right, just as Chinese characters are traditionally written from right to left. However, Chinese are read and written from left to right today, and the placement order of the deities are reversed.

When it comes to getting a good night's sleep, we'll readily admit that there are very few things we won't try. From lowering our thermostats to upgrading our mattresses, we've spilled a lot of ink on strategies for getting solid shut-eye. But as it turns out, optimizing our beds' feng shui could be one of the simpler ways of ensuring we get a restful night's sleep.
It's important to balance the yin and yang in the bedroom, and one way to do that is by mixing textures, says Cerrano. Yin (the feminine energy) is evident in soft textures like a plush rug or soft blanket and "brings in that mothering, nurturing energy and emotion," she explains. The masculine yang energy, on the other hand, can be found in hard wood floors, for example. However, men can have feminine energies and vice versa, which is why Cerrano suggests balancing hard and soft textures in the bedroom. Los agrees: “Too many bedrooms now are too yang."
If you're going to have mirrors in the bedroom, Brophy recommends avoiding hanging them across from the bed or across from windows. "Mirrors reflect energy and light," Brophy says. "Being able to see your reflection while you're in bed can be distracting. And if you hang a mirror across from a window, it will reflect light and may make it more difficult for you to sleep soundly."
If the bedroom is a place for rest and romance, then the items in that room should reflect that, says Tisha Morris, a certified feng shui consultant. “The energy in your home has a direct influence on you with each room representing a different aspect of self. The bedroom should only contain those items related to sleep, relaxation, and your relationship with your partner or yourself," says Morris.
Whether you’re on a Marie Kondo-inspired cleaning kick or made a New Year’s resolution to focus on self care, the bedroom is a great place to focus that fresh-start energy. While decluttering is always an excellent way to begin, it may also be time to feng shui your bedroom, which will not only leave it looking nicer but may also help you sleep better.
When building the new entrance to Hong Kong Disneyland, Walt Disney executives decided to shift the angle of the front gate by 12 degrees. They did so after consulting a feng shui specialist, who said the change would ensure prosperity for the park. Disney also put a bend in the walkway from the train station to the gate, to make sure the flow of positive energy, or chi, did not slip past the entrance and out to the China Sea. Heeding the advice of a feng shui consultant is one of many steps Disney executives have taken at the park to reflect the local culture -- and to make sure they do not repeat some mistakes of the past.
By now, it's commonly known (although widely ignored) that TVs, phones, and other electronics are causing us to get less sleep. But Cerrano takes it a step further, warning against electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from tech devices in the bedroom, especially if someone is ill or hyper-sensitive. She even advises turning off the wifi before going to bed, as it "can penetrate the mind and body." Note: Research around the effects of EMFs is slim, according to the World Health Organization, but positioning your wifi router away from wherever you spend the most time and even turning it off at night is still a good idea.
Beginning with palatial structures at Erlitou,[10] all capital cities of China followed rules of feng shui for their design and layout. During the Zhou era, the Kaogong ji (simplified Chinese: 考工记; traditional Chinese: 考工記; "Manual of Crafts") codified these rules. The carpenter's manual Lu ban jing (simplified Chinese: 鲁班经; traditional Chinese: 魯班經; "Lu ban's manuscript") codified rules for builders. Graves and tombs also followed rules of feng shui, from Puyang to Mawangdui and beyond. From the earliest records, the structures of the graves and dwellings seem to have followed the same rules.
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