The second best feng shui bedroom layout has the door to the side but the bed is still further away from the door, has a solid wall behind it and good grounding energy on both sides. Notice the biggest piece of furniture is again balancing the energy well (visualize a triangle between the two nightstands and the chest of drawers, this shows you the best furniture layout for a bedroom).
Aim for equality. Try to have equal space on either side of your bed and other furniture. A person should be able to walk around as easily around one side of the room as the other, within reason. Of course, a piece of furniture may add some inequality, but in general, you should avoid letting most of the stuff in the bedroom clutter over to one side, or you'll create discord in your most important room.
You'll also want to consult a Bagua map to see what elements to pull into your space. Locate what Bagua your bedroom is located in relationship to the front door of your house, and add accessories accordingly. For example, if your bedroom falls in the Health and Family area, where the dominant element is wood, try to incorporate greens and blues in order to sustain that element.
Feng shui Fu Dogs, or Imperial Guardian Lions, is a strong feng shui protection symbol. Fu Dogs were traditionally placed in front of Imperial palaces, temples, and government offices. Fu Dogs were also a traditional feng shui symbol of family wealth and social status and were placed in front of wealthy homes. Fu Dogs are usually displayed as a couple. 
Feng shui has a number of different "schools" or disciplines. A feng shui master from one of the major disciplines, the Compass school, will work with a "map" of eight sections known as the bagua, laying it over a room or an entire building. The bagua dedicates one section to each main chi objective - wealth, travel, romance, children, health, helpful friends, career, and fame or self-realization. It shows where the auspicious areas of a space are for amplifying those qualities.
Beginning with palatial structures at Erlitou,[10] all capital cities of China followed rules of feng shui for their design and layout. During the Zhou era, the Kaogong ji (simplified Chinese: 考工记; traditional Chinese: 考工記; "Manual of Crafts") codified these rules. The carpenter's manual Lu ban jing (simplified Chinese: 鲁班经; traditional Chinese: 魯班經; "Lu ban's manuscript") codified rules for builders. Graves and tombs also followed rules of feng shui, from Puyang to Mawangdui and beyond. From the earliest records, the structures of the graves and dwellings seem to have followed the same rules.
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