Feng shui can be used to decide the location, construction, and architectural features of buildings, the placement and style of furniture, colors and decorating schemes, and the location of plantings, paths, and other outside features. By creating a more pleasing atmosphere, feng shui has been credited with improving family communication, restoring employee cooperation, and increasing a store's sales.
Hello Feng Shui Nexus ! I have a question ! I was planning on adding a decorative decal to my ceiling bedroom of a galaxy space them. Not to large, the edges break away from ceiling to the outer cosmos. Would this affect my Feng Shui negatively or badly being that I hear purple and blue should avoided for ceiling bedroom Feng Shui and can cause clouded low thoughts ? Is this true ?
The Golden Rooster or the Red Rooster is a lucky element for those who want to obtain a promotion. On the other hand, it is beneficial when placed in the office because it balances the energies, it improves communication and it helps to establish new contacts and relationships. Chinese people like to decorate it with lucky coins and to place it in the north or south side of the office.
The feng shui energy of fruits is the energy of fruition. The use of specific fruits in traditional feng shui applications is often dictated by classifications from ancient texts as being specific symbols of longevity, wealth, prosperity, fertility, etc. Feng shui-wise, attention is often paid to the colors, numbers, as well as the symbolism of specific fruits.  
Chi is energy. It is the constantly moving and changing life force that we feel around us making us feel either good or bad in a certain location. Chi can accumulate in the objects around you. In your home or office, the chi will flow in through the door and out through the windows. The goal of Feng Shui improvements (or "cures") is to keep the chi flowing gently throughout your environment rather than running straight through it. Chi can have a negative effect on your surroundings when it gets stuck or blocked.
Make sure the bed is a good height. To allow for a balanced Feng Shui energy flow under the bed, you need to have your bed at a reasonable height above the floor level. Generally, the beds that have built-in storage drawers underneath to help you with storage solutions are considered bad Feng Shui beds. Why? Because the energy needs to circulate around your body when you sleep, which is not possible if the space underneath the bed is blocked.
Despite the common misconception, feng shui is about so much more than simply how things are arranged in a room (though placement certainly plays an important role). And when thinking about the bedroom, it’s important to keep in mind its role as an inner sanctum of sorts. “According to feng shui principles, a master bedroom should be a private place reserved for rest and romance only,” says Olmstead.

The most common feng shui use of the butterfly symbol is as a feng shui cure for love and romance, probably because love is the most transformative feeling that makes you feel like flying. The additional element of using the feng shui symbol of butterflies as a feng shui love cure is the element of freedom to choose among a number of suitors. The butterfly symbol is one of the best feng shui love cures for single people. 
In feng shui philosophy, your bedroom symbolizes you and affects you the most. We spend many hours sleeping in our beds, so the feng shui of our bedrooms is of the utmost importance. Once you get the bed in the commanding position, it’s also important to have space available on both sides of the bed. This means that you’ve made space for your partner (or future partner). Believe me: Nobody likes to sleep on the wall side! This also allows for a nightstand on each side of the bed. The nightstands do not have to match; however, it’s better if they are similar in size. If possible, there should be at least 2 feet of walking space on the left and right side of the bed, with the headboard against the wall. Yes, you do need a headboard! A solid headboard without bars or holes, fastened securely to the bed, creates stability and harmony. Finally, take some time to make your bed every morning and thank it for supporting you every night. It’s a beautiful way to start your day with a little bit of order and peace. That energy resonates throughout the whole day until your bed welcomes you back to sleep at night.
Although somewhat less important than the front door, the rest of the doors in the house symbolize the ease with which you flow through life and accomplish your intentions. So to minimize daily hassles, delays, and irritations, remove anything positioned behind doors in such a way that inhibits their full range of motion. In some cases, it can also feel better to remove hooks or racks from doors, specifically if they cause the door to feel heavier or more unwieldy.
Where you place your bed is very important in feng shui. Choose the wrong wall and you risk a long string of restless nights. The path from your bedroom door to the window has the strongest flow of energy; keep your bed out of this path if possible. Positioning your bed in front of a window is a big feng shui no-no. Ideally you should have a solid headboard or wall behind your bed (no diagonal placement either), a small table or chair on either side for support, and a low bench or a trunk at the foot of the bed.
I know many of us could use extra storage, but under the bed is not the place for it! In feng shui, it’s best to have the air flow all around you while you’re sleeping, so it’s a big no-no to have objects under the bed—especially sharp, dangerous items. Other items to watch out for are shoes, books, or anything associated with very active energy. If you have mementos from past relationships stored under there, it may mean that relationship is holding you back. If you must store something under the bed, make it something soft, like extra linens and pillows.
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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