For efficiency's sake, it's never practical to have two work stations situated back-to-back. Think about what it'll look like when two people are cooking. This is why many kitchen experts will suggest a triangular set up between the fridge, stove, and sink. But Benko suggests there is also a feng shui reasoning behind it: "There can be a conflict in the house when you have fire right across from water—water puts out fire."
Sha Chi is anything unpleasant that brings negative energy: a smelly pile of dirty laundry, harsh overhead lighting, clutter, dirt, or unclean bed linens. Charge your phone or tablet elsewhere to eliminate unwanted magnetic radiation, and wake up to a soundless (no tick tock!) clock with a gradual alarm like this one. Rid your room of anything dangerous, such as a rickety ceiling fan or a shelf with heavy objects mounted over your head.
The second best feng shui bedroom layout has the door to the side but the bed is still further away from the door, has a solid wall behind it and good grounding energy on both sides. Notice the biggest piece of furniture is again balancing the energy well (visualize a triangle between the two nightstands and the chest of drawers, this shows you the best furniture layout for a bedroom).
Everyone appreciates the benefits of beautiful, comfortable living environments; America’s billion-dollar interior decorating industry attests to this fact. However, Feng Shui takes the approach that your surroundings affect not just your level of material comfort but also your physical and mental health, your relationships, and your worldly success.
To maintain the peacefulness of your bedroom, keep it a work-free zone. That means keeping any work-related materials off of your night tables and moving your laptop and phone away from your bed. We know—this can be difficult in today's age of working from home, particularly if you live in a tight apartment. “If you're limited in space and must work in your bedroom, be sure your work area is as far from the bed as possible, and use a screen or plants to hide the area at night,” says Olmstead.

Most of us have televisions in our bedroom. It happens. If you have trouble sleeping it or even if you don’t, it is a good idea to cover the television when not in use. The active energy of the television as well as the electronic aspect of it may be disruptive to the type of calming quiet energy more conducive to sleep and bedrooms. My suggestion, find a beautiful scarf or fabric and just toss it over the television!
If you can part with having electromagnetic field appliances in your bedroom altogether, that's even better, says Cerrano. "Choosing to leave those types of EMF appliances within your bedroom during sleep increases interference with your circadian rhythm. This is especially true with young children and adolescents," she adds. "Making it an evening habit to turn off your Wi-Fi before going to sleep is another way to help reduce radio frequency pollution," she suggests.
6. Find beauty in your accessories. In your bedroom, feng shui suggests hanging your favorite pieces of art on the wall opposite your bed. This way it’s the last thing you see before you go to sleep and the first thing you see when you wake up. Your artwork should be something that makes you feel joyful and inspired. If your direct view from the bed is your bathroom or messy closet, screen those views with curtains or simply by closing the door. Another item you don’t want to place opposite, next to, or over your bed is a mirror. In addition to bouncing too much energy around the room to allow for a good nights rest, these reflective surfaces are thought to magnify problems and worries.
Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.
Bright lights keep us awake and can disrupt our sleep pattern. It is true even with artificial lights and especially true for LED lights, which is known to create “light pollution” that causes sleepless nights (this is also the reason why it’s bad feng shui to sleep with your head under a window). Try to use dim lights with a soothing color, as it can provide the atmosphere and environment as you are getting ready for bed.
The Mystic Knot is one of the most often used symbols in feng shui. Being a combination of six times the infinity symbol, this feng shui knot symbolizes a long and happy life full of good fortune. Mystic knot is sometimes referred to as the endless knot​ because it looks like it swallows its own tail. In Buddhism, the mystic knot is one of the 8 magical auspicious objects. 
In Taoist and feng shui theory, yin and yang are opposites that are dependent upon one another and which must always be in balance. The principle of duality—the idea that all things are balanced blends of two things—is at the root of yin/yang theory. While most other spiritual philosophies believe in opposing dualities, such as good vs. evil, the Chinese Taoist system believes that balance and equilibrium between opposites is the desirable state. Discord occurs when one principle outweighs the other. 
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
×