Despite the common misconception, feng shui is about so much more than simply how things are arranged in a room (though placement certainly plays an important role). And when thinking about the bedroom, it’s important to keep in mind its role as an inner sanctum of sorts. “According to feng shui principles, a master bedroom should be a private place reserved for rest and romance only,” says Olmstead.

The tree loves light, but not direct sunlight, and the air humidity must be of a minimum of 60%, this is why the leaves need to be spayed in case the air in the room is dry. It needs to be watered once per week in order to maintain the soil wet and to remove the excess of the water from the plate. In winter, if the room temperature is below 18º C, the watering needs to be decreased.
The rooster may be the same as the Rooster King mentioned below (I am not sure, but their uses seem to differ). The rooster has a literal use. The figurine can be used to counter the “Centipede Xa”, symbolizing the rooster devouring the centipede. The “Centipede Xa” comes from power lines or pipes, resembling a centipede, that are visible from your kid’s bedroom (if you have kids) or kitchen window. To cure the Xa, place the rooster figurine facing towards the “centipede” as a cure for this negative Feng Shui energy.

General neglect. Some people's dining rooms are a dumping ground for mail, kids' stuff—just a mess that never gets cleared. And in some homes the room is totally ignored; no one ever sets foot in there. This depletes its energy, which makes it even less appealing. If you don't often use the room for meals, activate it in another way. Put a plant there so you're forced to come in and water it. Or bring your laptop in and use the space as an office.
Decorate your home and office with specific feng shui wealth cures that appeal to your taste and style. There is a variety of feng shui money cures – from traditional to modern – so take your time and bring into your space only the wealth cures that really speak to you of abundance and wealth. No matter which feng shui cure you choose – an aquarium for wealth or the Laughing Buddha, be sure you choose wisely.
Chi is energy. It is the constantly moving and changing life force that we feel around us making us feel either good or bad in a certain location. Chi can accumulate in the objects around you. In your home or office, the chi will flow in through the door and out through the windows. The goal of Feng Shui improvements (or "cures") is to keep the chi flowing gently throughout your environment rather than running straight through it. Chi can have a negative effect on your surroundings when it gets stuck or blocked.
A few years later I found feng shui again, but this time with a new viewpoint: a Western viewpoint, grounded in tradition but also in science, so it made new sense to me. I tried more feng shui tips from this point of view, but this time the tips seemed to have more of a connection to my actual living space and lifestyle. They forced me to readjust myself in my space and see things in a new way.
General neglect. Some people's dining rooms are a dumping ground for mail, kids' stuff—just a mess that never gets cleared. And in some homes the room is totally ignored; no one ever sets foot in there. This depletes its energy, which makes it even less appealing. If you don't often use the room for meals, activate it in another way. Put a plant there so you're forced to come in and water it. Or bring your laptop in and use the space as an office.
Without question, the money is always at the front door. Give your porch and front door area a good cleaning. Is there a broken light bulb or a dying plant? Anything that doesn’t work properly, look auspicious or that’s dirty (like a light fixture with dead bugs in it), will lower your financial energy. Spruce up your front door and walkway. Add a pretty pot of flowers here and keep the porch light on and the area will-lit to invite money and opportunity to your home.
Feng shui is sometimes thought to be the art of placement—understanding how the placement of yourself and objects within a space affects your life in various areas of experience. It is a complex body of knowledge that teaches you how to balance and harmonize with the energies in any given space—be it a home, office, or garden. Its aim is to assure good fortune for the people inhabiting a space. Although regarded by some in the scientific community as a pseudo-science, feng shui has had an impact on the aesthetics of interior design and the architectural layout of living and working spaces both in its native eastern and, more recently, western cultures.  
It’s time to start a new Pinterest board. According to feng shui principles, Cho recommends opting for a sturdy headboard, preferably a wooden one, with no bars or holes on it. “The headboard keeps you connected with your partner and stabilizes you in bed. Not having a headboard makes your relationship feel more temporary,” Cho says. And if you’re single, a sturdy headboard can help attract a strong and secure relationship, proponents believe. If buying a new headboard isn’t in your budget right now, some feng shui experts suggest adding two large pillows behind your sleeping pillows. This makes for a comfortable and soft DIY “headboard” in the meantime. But Cho warns, “It’s better to have a headboard if at all possible. If you can’t afford one, then you can try the pillows but it’s not a substitute for a solid headboard.”
A colored object placed within the Life Area (of your space) associated with that color can help energize that space. By placing the Feng Shui Octagon, a tool for mapping the energies of a home or lot, over your lot plan or a floor plan of your home (starting with the first floor and then moving to any additional floors), you can figure out which parts of your home fall in which Life Areas and cure them with an appropriately colored object.
"It's believed that mirrors have the ability to activate the energy within a room. Clients I work with will sometimes choose to keep a mirror in their bedroom and tell me that they sleep soundly. Others will negotiate the principle and remove extra mirrors and still keep one while being mindful of what it reflects. Some clients love the idea of no mirrors in the bedroom or may just place a long mirror inside the closet door. If you do that, just make sure the closet is organised because mirrors double what they project. The most important thing is to test and measure this feng shui insight because every person is different. Find what works for you."
Sha Chi is anything unpleasant that brings negative energy: a smelly pile of dirty laundry, harsh overhead lighting, clutter, dirt, or unclean bed linens. Charge your phone or tablet elsewhere to eliminate unwanted magnetic radiation, and wake up to a soundless (no tick tock!) clock with a gradual alarm like this one. Rid your room of anything dangerous, such as a rickety ceiling fan or a shelf with heavy objects mounted over your head.

The main difference between the practices of feng shui (or "vastu" in the Hindu culture) and Western traditions is a belief that we as humans are connected to the spaces we inhabit. Believers in feng shui see sacred purposes and mystical meanings behind design -- not just artistically appealing buildings or superficially pretty surroundings. They view the world in terms of cosmic energy.

Benko says there is a slew of emotional issues constantly being displayed in her clients' homes. "Do you have trouble getting clarity? Check if you have stuff all over your surfaces. Do you have self-esteem issues? Check if your mirrors are hung too high, so you can never measure up. Are you chronically single? Assess if you're loading up your home with single imagery—a single vase, a single chair, a single person in a picture."
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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