The "form" in Form School refers to the shape of the environment, such as mountains, rivers, plateaus, buildings, and general surroundings. It considers the five celestial animals (phoenix, green dragon, white tiger, black turtle, and the yellow snake), the yin-yang concept and the traditional five elements (Wu Xing: wood, fire, earth, metal, and water).

Bedrooms beautiful spaces of all that represents you. It is well known that you can tell so much from a person just by how htere bedrrom looks and feels. Your bedroom reveals so much from a your interior style, daily lifestyle and personality. A bedroom is a sacred place and should be treated as such, it should reflect the inner most deepest sense of oneself. Its a sanctuary a place to shut out the world and be at one with yourself and your intimate thoughts and feelings.
Today, we are exposed to various feng shui systems and school of thoughts but classical feng shui, the one documented in classical Chinese texts, is divided into just two major systems: the oldest one which focuses on the observation of landforms and environmental features and the youngest one which is primarily based on formulas and takes in consideration that Qi changes over time but it is cyclical so it can be tracked and anticipated.

The three deities should be placed side by side like the image shown above. Shou should be on the left of the viewer, Lu in the middle, and Fu on the far right, just as Chinese characters are traditionally written from right to left. However, Chinese are read and written from left to right today, and the placement order of the deities are reversed.
Nature is the ultimate manifestation of unlimited wealth and abundance, so replicating the lush energy of nature in your home will help you attract the same quality of energy. Money plant or not, lucky bamboo or not, know that decorating your home with lush, verdant happy plants in good looking, solid pots is an excellent feng shui wealth magnet. The East, the Southeast, and the South areas are the most greenery loving feng shui areas in your home.
I know many of us could use extra storage, but under the bed is not the place for it! In feng shui, it’s best to have the air flow all around you while you’re sleeping, so it’s a big no-no to have objects under the bed—especially sharp, dangerous items. Other items to watch out for are shoes, books, or anything associated with very active energy. If you have mementos from past relationships stored under there, it may mean that relationship is holding you back. If you must store something under the bed, make it something soft, like extra linens and pillows.
Without question, the money is always at the front door. Give your porch and front door area a good cleaning. Is there a broken light bulb or a dying plant? Anything that doesn’t work properly, look auspicious or that’s dirty (like a light fixture with dead bugs in it), will lower your financial energy. Spruce up your front door and walkway. Add a pretty pot of flowers here and keep the porch light on and the area will-lit to invite money and opportunity to your home.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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