Water is an ancient symbol of abundance in all cultures, not only in feng shui. Use feng shui fountains – a powerful feng shui cure to attract wealth and fresh Chi. If a fountain will not work in your space or you are just not comfortable with the idea, you can use images of flowing water such as waterfalls, rivers, etc. Any water image is an excellent feng shui for wealth energizer, just be sure the water is clear and moving. So, images of a fast flowing river or a waterfall, for example, are better feng shui for wealth cures than the images of a quiet lake or a pond.

A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."

5. Minimize. Your bedroom should be a place of rest, contemplation, and intimacy. Exercise equipment, phones, and a TV give off and take up a lot of energy. The bedroom is a place where you turn off the stresses of the day. If you must have your bedroom serve double duty, use a folding screen or hanging fabric to conceal them. If you’re not willing to part with your TV, keep it in an armoire or cabinet so you can shut the door while you sleep.
This can be tough if storage space is at a premium, but avoid storing anything under the bed. "Whatever is below will rise above," says Cerrano. That means you don’t want to store things under the bed that may trigger an emotional response, like bills or mementos from loved ones. Linens and things of that nature are considered neutral, so feel free to store those underneath if needed, but Cerrano notes, “Ideally we want the energy to flow under and around the bed unobstructed.”
Beginning with palatial structures at Erlitou,[10] all capital cities of China followed rules of feng shui for their design and layout. During the Zhou era, the Kaogong ji (simplified Chinese: 考工记; traditional Chinese: 考工記; "Manual of Crafts") codified these rules. The carpenter's manual Lu ban jing (simplified Chinese: 鲁班经; traditional Chinese: 魯班經; "Lu ban's manuscript") codified rules for builders. Graves and tombs also followed rules of feng shui, from Puyang to Mawangdui and beyond. From the earliest records, the structures of the graves and dwellings seem to have followed the same rules.
×