Hi victor , I was just wondering where could I place my bed it’s a little bit small space. If I place my bed in a command position the feet of my bed will face the closet door but it will also beside the window and some part of the bed has a poison arrow because of the edge of closet. But the other option is that the bed position will be close to the bedroom door. What should I do. ? Where should I put the bed? Hope you can help me. Thank u
It’s well-known that colors can have a strong impact on mood and emotions, so it’s no surprise that the color of your bedroom is worth paying attention to. “The feng shui rule of thumb is that warm colors create warmth in your relationship, while cool colors can cool it down,” explains Olmstead. She recommends a light, neutral color for the bedroom.
In feng shui, a cluttered house equals a cluttered mind. Even worse, clutter literally sucks up the energy in a space. "You may think you're hiding your clutter, but the closet has as much of an effect on energy flow as anything else," says Whitehurst. If there's clutter somewhere in your home — even tucked away in an attic — then it's also cluttering your head, as well as the rest of your body.
So what is feng shui? “Feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is a design system for arranging your surroundings in harmony and balance with the natural world around you,” explains Carol M. Olmstead, FSIA, feng shui master practitioner at Feng Shui for Real Life. “Your surroundings have a powerful effect on what you attract into your life. When the energy around you is blocked, your prosperity, relationships, health, and well-being can be affected. When the energy is balanced, good things naturally flow into your life.”
To demystify some of the rules of this ancient Chinese tradition, we tapped New York–based professor, feng shui expert, and author of The Holistic Home, Laura Benko to give us simple, actionable tips on how to incorporate its philosophy in our homes. Benko is widely acclaimed for having rebranded feng shui into a more modern, holistic approach while still honoring age-old traditions. To Benko, feng shui is not about transforming the structure of a home, but about making our homes evolve with us. Though nearly imperceptible, these small tweaks can have a "profound impact on your daily life," she insists.

Avoid a mirror that faces your bed or a mirrored set of closet doors. If these mirrors are fixtures that you can't get rid of, then drape some fabric over them. Left exposed, they are thought to disturb your sleep. In general, you should avoid having mirrors in your bedroom, especially if you're sharing it with a romantic partner, because they may open up a space for infidelity. Mirrors are also too energetic for such a restful space.
4. Ventilate and brighten, in other words encourage good quality air to circulate and let lots of light into your house. These two elements are essential for good chi. Open bedroom windows first thing in the morning to allow moisture to escape (taking care not to leave ground floor rooms unattended for security reasons). And once you’ve exhausted all possible avenues to let in natural light, consider using full-spectrum lighting to further brighten up a space.
Hello, I have a question about your article: “Feng Shui Tips for Money”. Your article says to replace any broken items in your home. We live in a rented apartment and the landlord did not do the usual fix-ups when the former tenants moved out. We moved in with the blinds broken in all four window, cracked closet doors, the door frame to the master bedroom is broken and won’t stay shut when closed (you can simply push the door open when “closed”, you don’t need to use the door knob to open/close the door), bathroom tiles messed up such that you have a hard time opening/closing the door and the closet inside the bathroom, problems with plumbing and the stove and refrigerator…crayola marks everywhere, cigarette burns in the carpets and you get the idea here. The apartment was in such a poor state, we refused to give the landlord a deposit unless we could do a walk-through with him and get it in writing about all the broken and poor conditions of everything. He had a fit and would not do it. We’ve been living here since late August, 2015. He finally fixed the plumbing issues and our heater. But that’s all he fixed. We are not responsible for any of the other things, so how would your Feng Shui tips to repair broken things in the home really apply in our situation? What would be a “work around” for NOT doing repairs to a rented apartment, when they were already there when we moved into the unit? Also, about the citrine in the windowsill.. we have four large windows, each with a windowsill. Do I put a piece of citrine in just one of them or in all four? If in only one windowsill, which one? Kitchen, living room, master bedroom (this is being used as our temple/cat room) – or in our bedroom?
The association of the energy of water with wealth is obvious, very ancient and present in all cultures. Fountains are the most popular feng shui for wealth cure,  so if you love fountains, find one (or more) good quality fountains and place them in the best feng shui areas of your home (either inside or outside). I adore this water bell fountain by Woodstock, a classic by now and absolutely the best feng shui fountain I ever experienced! Be sure not to place a fountain in your bedroom – this is not good feng shui.
An excellent way to stimulate chi energy for your finances or career is to add a water fountain in your home office or inside the entrance of your home. Make sure the fountain flows into your home or office and never towards the door. You can opt for an aquarium if you prefer. Place it in the North sector of your home or office to stimulate the career sector or in the Southeast to activate the wealth sector. Have at least 8 red fish and 1 black fish, the lucky number of fish, for attracting auspicious chi energy.
Broken things have no place in your home. Everyone I know would be upset about a broken car, but they have broken door handles, broken appliances and all sorts of broken architecture everywhere in their living environment. Your space is a mirror of you. Don’t let it stay broken! While fixing things in your home you may find it easier to confront and fix other lingering issues or problems in your life at the same time.
Anjie Cho, feng shui expert, interior designer and creator of Holistic Spaces, says, “Your bedroom represents you. Other than maybe your office, you spend a majority of your time in your bedroom, especially if you get six to eight hours of sleep at night.” And that’s when the so-called magic happens: “Because you’re unconscious and in a passive state while you sleep, you’re open to absorbing energy around you more easily,” Cho says.

You might not realize it, but the energy from the things you store underneath your bed can transfer to you, Cho says. That’s why feng shui practitioners advise clearing out the chaos, so energy can flow easily around you while you’re sleeping. “If those things have or represent active energy, like shoes, books or an exercise mat, you can absorb it on a subconscious level.” If you absolutely have to store things there (hello city living!), Cho recommends limiting them to soft items, like bed sheets, linens and pillows.
Astrid Madsen is the editor of SelfBuild & Improve Your Home magazine. She previously held the same role in an Irish trade publication, before that she worked at the National Standards Authority of Ireland. She graduated with a BA in Urban Studies from Columbia University in New York and holds an MBA from the Instituto de Estudios Bursatiles in Madrid. France of origin, she now lives in Portarlington, County Laois, where she's taken on the task of renovating a listed building! Email [email protected]

“When it comes to choosing bedding, go with something that feels good and that you’re drawn to,” Cho says. “I recommend getting organic cotton sheets whenever possible because they’re toxin-free and breathable. No one sleeps well if they’re too hot or too cold,” Cho says. Softness matters, too. The general rule is that the higher the thread count, the softer the sheets. The National Sleep Foundation recommends going with a thread count between 200 and 400. (Though, in the summer, you’ll want the thread count to be on the lower end to help with airflow.)
If the bedroom is a place for rest and romance, then the items in that room should reflect that, says Tisha Morris, a certified feng shui consultant. “The energy in your home has a direct influence on you with each room representing a different aspect of self. The bedroom should only contain those items related to sleep, relaxation, and your relationship with your partner or yourself," says Morris.
No, feng shui consultants won't encourage you to float your bed at a weird angle in the middle of the room and paint your walls four different colors (at least not the ones we spoke to). In fact, feng shui terminology prefers the term principles to rules. Why? "Principles are meant to be flexible, which allows the mind more room for creative solutions when needed," says New York–based feng shui consultant Laura Cerrano.
Bright lights rev up energy. If you're trying to keep energy costs down, then place high-wattage bulbs in the hallways, and lower-wattage bulbs in the rest of the house. "Hallways represent the meridians; the brighter the wattage, the more clean and clear your veins and arteries are," says Whitehurst. Want to light up internally? Place objects around your house that elicit positive emotions and lift your own personal chi. If a particular item makes you feel giddy, put it in a place where it's easy to see.
Partly because of the Cultural Revolution, in today's mainland China less than one-third of the population believe in feng shui, and the proportion of believers among young urban Chinese is said to be much lower[73] Learning feng shui is still somewhat considered taboo in today's China.[74][75][76] Nevertheless, it is reported that feng shui has gained adherents among Communist Party officials according to a BBC Chinese news commentary in 2006,[77] and since the beginning of Chinese economic reforms the number of feng shui practitioners is increasing. A number of Chinese academics permitted to research on the subject of feng shui are anthropologists or architects by profession, studying the history of feng shui or historical feng shui theories behind the design of heritage buildings, such as Cao Dafeng, the Vice-President of Fudan University,[78] and Liu Shenghuan of Tongji University.
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