Use your feng shui birth element to help create a home that nourishes and supports your energy. For example, if your birth element is Fire, you can introduce the expressions of the Fire element, such as triangular shapes or the Fire colors: red, orange, purple, magenta, pink, and yellow. You will also want a strong Wood element in your home, as Wood feeds the Fire element in the productive cycle of the five feng shui elements.
EDGEWATER, a modest slip of a city beside the Hudson -- it's three miles long and just three-quarters of a mile wide -- has enjoyed a growth spurt over the last 15 years, gaining fine dining establishments and high-class shops, and doubling its population to nearly 10,000. Now, a developer has decided that Edgewater is ready for a Manhattan-style condominium tower.
Not all bedrooms are ideal candidates for feng shui layouts. Most American homes weren't built with any feng shui considerations, so the challenges are always present when trying to create an auspicious feng shui bedroom layout and design. This is especially true of small bedrooms. Space is a premium in small bedrooms. This includes wall space that's often broken up by doors and windows.
There is a specific money area in feng shui that needs to be treated right, and for this, you have to know the bagua, or the feng shui energy of your space. Here I am referring to the creation of a small altar/shrine/sacred space that you devote to the energy of wealth. It can be anywhere (except your bathroom, laundry or garage), and as big or as small as you like. Basically, you want to create an area that has the task of collecting wealth energy. Decorate it with meaningful to you items of wealth (jewelry, specific photos, objects of value, etc),  as well as good feng shui energy activators such as crystals and plants.

To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.
"Not a single thing!" Brophy says. Because every item has its own energy, the more stuff that's piled under the bed (even if it's just extra bedding!), the less space there is for your own energy to pass through while you sleep. This can be a tough one, especially if you're lacking in the square footage department, but Brophy swears this is helpful to everyone, and particularly recommends it for people who have difficulty sleeping.
Imperial palaces and cities were planned according to feng shui, which became a principle of classical Chinese architecture. Beijing's Forbidden City is an example. A spectacular complex of palaces, administrative buildings, and temples arranged around a series of courtyards, the Forbidden City was the capital of China during the Ming and Qing dynasties.

Get rid of any clutter. To have optimal Feng Shui in your bedroom, you have to get rid of any extra papers, trash, old trinkets, silly photos, useless gifts, or really just anything you don't really need in there. If you have too much sentimental attachment to some of the items, you can put them in storage or another room, but work on minimizing the stuff you really need in your bedroom. Having a spare and uncluttered bedroom will lead to an uncluttered and fulfilling life.

Most of us have at least one mirror in the bedroom, if not more, but feng shui experts advise against this. “If possible, remove mirrors from the bedroom, as the reflective energy causes excess energy in the room that can be disruptive to sleep,” says Morris. If a mirror in your room is non-negotiable, there are a few possible workarounds, according to Laura Cerrano, a certified feng shui expert and CEO and founder at Feng Shui Manhattan. She suggests covering the mirror at night or placing the mirror so it is not facing the bed.
Feng shui is so important to some strong believers, that they use it for healing purposes (although there is no empirical evidence that this practice is in any way effective) in addition to guide their businesses and create a peaceful atmosphere in their homes,[90] in particular in the bedroom where a number of techniques involving colours and arrangement are used to achieve enhanced comfort and more peaceful sleep.[citation needed] In 2005, even Disney acknowledged feng shui as an important part of Chinese culture by shifting the main gate to Hong Kong Disneyland by twelve degrees in their building plans, among many other actions suggested by the master planner of architecture and design at Walt Disney Imagineering, Wing Chao, in an effort to incorporate local culture into the theme park.[91]
Your bedroom is your shelter from the storm. Delight the five senses by filling it with anything soft, sensuous, or soothing: soft rugs for your cold feet, a luxurious faux fur throw, fluffy down pillows and duvets, scents from essential oils, a luxe velvet robe, the softest silk negligee, a cluster of candles or a low wattage lamp, and a record player with an old record collection waiting nearby.
While we’re in the entry area, let’s activate your front door. The front door is literally and metaphorically how energy walks into your home. On an auspicious day like your birthday or a new moon, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. (the most yang hours of the day), write a list of nine wishes for yourself using a newly purchased black pen on a sheet of red paper. Read your list out loud, and then with respect, mindfully sign the list. Carefully fold the sheet and place it in a red envelope. Securely position your intentions and aspirations above the front door, on the inside of your home. Now, every time you walk through your front door, you are invoking the energy of these wishes so they may manifest in your life. (Note: You can also use this for your bedroom door if you live with roommates.)
Images can be very powerful, we all know that. They can be of great help with expressing a desired quality of energy when the real objects are not available, not suitable or cannot be placed well in your home. For example, you might not want plants in your space for whatever reasons, but you can always go for images of lush energy – no constant care needed, always fresh! The same principle applies to images of water. If fountains are not to your (or your home’s) liking, you can use images of clear (and ideally moving) water as a wealth feng shui cure. High-quality wall murals work wonders in most spaces.

Most of us have at least one mirror in the bedroom, if not more, but feng shui experts advise against this. “If possible, remove mirrors from the bedroom, as the reflective energy causes excess energy in the room that can be disruptive to sleep,” says Morris. If a mirror in your room is non-negotiable, there are a few possible workarounds, according to Laura Cerrano, a certified feng shui expert and CEO and founder at Feng Shui Manhattan. She suggests covering the mirror at night or placing the mirror so it is not facing the bed.
To ensure the constant flow of good energy throughout the home, wind (air) and light must move as well. You’ve decluttered your home in step one, making it easier for energy to flow. Now open the windows to increase air flow. Maximize light movement by keeping all glass, mirrors and windows clean. Have a dark corner or space that needs a little brightening? Add a lamp to illuminate the spot, or place a mirror to reflect light from a different spot.

Feng shui has a number of different "schools" or disciplines. A feng shui master from one of the major disciplines, the Compass school, will work with a "map" of eight sections known as the bagua, laying it over a room or an entire building. The bagua dedicates one section to each main chi objective - wealth, travel, romance, children, health, helpful friends, career, and fame or self-realization. It shows where the auspicious areas of a space are for amplifying those qualities.
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Everyone appreciates the benefits of beautiful, comfortable living environments; America’s billion-dollar interior decorating industry attests to this fact. However, Feng Shui takes the approach that your surroundings affect not just your level of material comfort but also your physical and mental health, your relationships, and your worldly success.

The bagua map is used by first orienting yourself to the main entrance to the house, or the entry to an individual room, then using the map to identify the different key areas of the space. Then, specific items can be positioned in those key areas to enhance the feng shui. For example, the place defined as the wisdom area is a good place for a small stack of books, while the love and relationship space is a good place for a wedding photo. 

It’s time to start a new Pinterest board. According to feng shui principles, Cho recommends opting for a sturdy headboard, preferably a wooden one, with no bars or holes on it. “The headboard keeps you connected with your partner and stabilizes you in bed. Not having a headboard makes your relationship feel more temporary,” Cho says. And if you’re single, a sturdy headboard can help attract a strong and secure relationship, proponents believe. If buying a new headboard isn’t in your budget right now, some feng shui experts suggest adding two large pillows behind your sleeping pillows. This makes for a comfortable and soft DIY “headboard” in the meantime. But Cho warns, “It’s better to have a headboard if at all possible. If you can’t afford one, then you can try the pillows but it’s not a substitute for a solid headboard.”

So, there you have it, your 3 feng shui for wealth tips! As with any feng shui applications — be it for health, for love or for money — you have to be patient and genuine in your feng shui work. Feng shui has been successfully used for over five thousand years, so it can certainly help you, too. Just make an effort to be consistent, and always use your best judgment.


Now that we've sorted out your bedroom furniture—where is the best place to position your bed for good feng shui? "Every bedroom layout is unique, which means you really need to be observant and creative in how these feng shui principles could best fit your personal space," cautions Cerrano. "In general, it's best to allow your bed to be placed against a solid wall, as this psychologically provides a feeling of support and protection."
Getting started with feng shui for your home is easy when you begin with the house basics and gradually move on to the more complex feng shui levels. After you have mastered these seven home feng shui steps, you can explore the deeper levels of feng shui, such as the annual movement of feng shui stars, or energies. The important things to remember are to start simply, have fun, and thoroughly enjoy the process—this is good feng shui.
Below is a helpful colour wheel that demonstrates the Feng Shui relationship between colour and mood. In Feng Shui, when a practitioner refers to a colour chart, they generally are referring to the colours associated with each life area of the pakua. In addition to the specific life areas and colours, each of the nine sections of the pakua also has a corresponding element and direction.

Place grounding and balanced energy on both sides of the bed. Place two nightstands on either side of the bed to create balance while you sleep. Ideally, you can also place the same lamp on both nightstands, to add some soft lighting to your bedroom. This balance is important for keeping you centered, and especially for maintaining equality in a relationship if you share the bedroom with your partner.
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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