Hello, I have a question about your article: “Feng Shui Tips for Money”. Your article says to replace any broken items in your home. We live in a rented apartment and the landlord did not do the usual fix-ups when the former tenants moved out. We moved in with the blinds broken in all four window, cracked closet doors, the door frame to the master bedroom is broken and won’t stay shut when closed (you can simply push the door open when “closed”, you don’t need to use the door knob to open/close the door), bathroom tiles messed up such that you have a hard time opening/closing the door and the closet inside the bathroom, problems with plumbing and the stove and refrigerator…crayola marks everywhere, cigarette burns in the carpets and you get the idea here. The apartment was in such a poor state, we refused to give the landlord a deposit unless we could do a walk-through with him and get it in writing about all the broken and poor conditions of everything. He had a fit and would not do it. We’ve been living here since late August, 2015. He finally fixed the plumbing issues and our heater. But that’s all he fixed. We are not responsible for any of the other things, so how would your Feng Shui tips to repair broken things in the home really apply in our situation? What would be a “work around” for NOT doing repairs to a rented apartment, when they were already there when we moved into the unit? Also, about the citrine in the windowsill.. we have four large windows, each with a windowsill. Do I put a piece of citrine in just one of them or in all four? If in only one windowsill, which one? Kitchen, living room, master bedroom (this is being used as our temple/cat room) – or in our bedroom?

If the bedroom is a place for rest and romance, then the items in that room should reflect that, says Tisha Morris, a certified feng shui consultant. “The energy in your home has a direct influence on you with each room representing a different aspect of self. The bedroom should only contain those items related to sleep, relaxation, and your relationship with your partner or yourself," says Morris.
Nonetheless, after Richard Nixon journeyed to the People's Republic of China in 1972, feng shui became marketable in the United States and has since been reinvented by New Age entrepreneurs for Western consumption. Critics of contemporary feng shui are concerned that with the passage of time much of the theory behind it has been lost in translation, not paid proper consideration, frowned upon, or even scorned. Robert T. Carroll sums up what feng shui has become in some instances:
Make sure you have something representing the five elements — wood, earth, metal, fire, and water — in every room. The goal is to stay grounded, centered, and balanced in your life and your environment. For example, place a wooden bowl filled with stone pebbles alongside a candle and a vase of flowers. Or try to incorporate colors that symbolize the five elements:
The number 4 symbolizes stability and a strong foundation, and it represents the four directions and the four seasons. The number 4 is sometimes considered unlucky in Chinese Feng Shui because it sounds like the word "death" in certain Chinese dialects, but it doesn’t have this association for Western cultures. If you have a number four in your address and you are from a country other than China, instead of worrying whether the number four is unlucky, try thinking of four as sounding like the word "more."
It might be tempting to treat your bedroom as a storage unit, but Cerrano warns against having too much stuff in your in there. In fact, studies conducted by St. Lawrence University in 2015 suggest a correlation between excessive bedroom clutter and sleep disturbances, which could lead to depression and irritability. "Feng shui principles invite you to remove electronics from inside the bedroom: TVs, computers, and cell phones emit the largest amounts of electric and magnetic fields, which could disturb your immune system and sleep," explains Cerrano.
The feng shui energy of fruits is the energy of fruition. The use of specific fruits in traditional feng shui applications is often dictated by classifications from ancient texts as being specific symbols of longevity, wealth, prosperity, fertility, etc. Feng shui-wise, attention is often paid to the colors, numbers, as well as the symbolism of specific fruits.  
A colored object placed within the Life Area (of your space) associated with that color can help energize that space. By placing the Feng Shui Octagon, a tool for mapping the energies of a home or lot, over your lot plan or a floor plan of your home (starting with the first floor and then moving to any additional floors), you can figure out which parts of your home fall in which Life Areas and cure them with an appropriately colored object.
If you happen to have an uncovered drain in your shower, bathtub, or any of your sinks – especially one that resembles a black hole – you unfortunately have a powerful visual affirmation of wealth and resources draining too quickly out of your bank account and life. Luckily, the solution is simple: take a trip to the hardware store and get yourself a drain cover.
In a practical world, televisions and laptops are often a necessary evil in your sacred bedroom space. It's impossible to get away from technology, so a compromise solution is to place your TV in an armoire or another cabinet that can be closed when you're finished watching TV for the night. Close your laptop when not being used and store inside a nightstand or drawer. That way, they are at least out of sight and your space while you rest.
Most feng shui experts believe that all electronics should be banned from the bedroom. Marks agrees, noting, "I want to say a special word here about televisions. Get it out of the bedroom! You're inviting strangers into your bedroom every time you turn the TV on, bringing that often harsh outer world into your private chamber. Perhaps more importantly, you are distracting yourselves from each other."
If you do decide to use crystals, the type of crystal and its placement matters, according to some Feng Shui practitioners. For instance, two rose quartz hearts can be placed in Southwest to promote better relationship. Another popular one is the purple amethyst, which is said to clear negative energies in an area and can be used for the Personal Growth Bagua area of your home.
Laura Cerrano’s biggest all-purpose feng shui suggestion is to kill the clutter in every part of your apartment. “No matter if you're a millionaire or if you’re dealing with unemployment, the pitfall everyone falls into is clutter,” she says. “Clutter isn’t just about aesthetics — it’s been proven to be detrimental to your mind, to the neurons in your brain. It creates stress.”
Electronics, such as your smartphone or alarm clock, are great human inventions. It tells you the current time and give you your friend’s Facebook status updates. However, most of us are addicted to our smartphones, and staring at this artificial light before bed is wrecking your sleep. Remove them from easy-access, and you can find your sleep quality improve.
“When it comes to choosing bedding, go with something that feels good and that you’re drawn to,” Cho says. “I recommend getting organic cotton sheets whenever possible because they’re toxin-free and breathable. No one sleeps well if they’re too hot or too cold,” Cho says. Softness matters, too. The general rule is that the higher the thread count, the softer the sheets. The National Sleep Foundation recommends going with a thread count between 200 and 400. (Though, in the summer, you’ll want the thread count to be on the lower end to help with airflow.)
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By now, you’re probably getting a pretty good idea that in feng shui, water equals wealth. As such, a fountain – particularly a round one that flows equally in all directions – is a powerful wealth charm and affirmation of constantly flowing finances. A fountain is particularly wonderful near the front door, indoors or out. (I have one similar to this in my office and I really like it. It’s like wind chimes and a fountain all in one.)
To be more specific, the dragon turtle is used to improve social relationships and prevent unnecessary dramas. Dragon turtle can also help with career advancements and is especially helpful those who work in the fields of public relations, sales, and other jobs that require lots socializing. To use the dragon turtle with these purposes, place it on your office desk with its head facing outward.
Though some claim that TV helps them sleep, the light and sound from the TV are actually causing us to stay awake longer than needed. The light from the TV is a form of artificial light that has the tendency to keep us awake by delaying the release of sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin.  Further, whatever show or movie that you’re watching can also invoke strong emotions that’ll keep you awake longer than usual.
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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