Feng shui can be used to decide the location, construction, and architectural features of buildings, the placement and style of furniture, colors and decorating schemes, and the location of plantings, paths, and other outside features. By creating a more pleasing atmosphere, feng shui has been credited with improving family communication, restoring employee cooperation, and increasing a store's sales.
The flowers are blooming and spring is in the air! Since Spring is the time for spring cleaning, now is the time to rethink, reorganize and revitalize your house with a little Feng Shui. Here are 9 simple tips for bringing positivity into your home with Feng Shui design principles. Nine is the most auspicious number in Feng Shui, so if you can manage to do all nine of these, you will attract even more good energy!
I always tell my clients to opt for wall colors that are skin tones to promote maximal rest. Off-white, creams, chocolate browns, and peach tones are great. These colors are thought to promote maximum sensuality and peaceful vibes. One word of caution: Don't overdo it on the peach! It is thought to be very effective at attracting a partner—so effective that we need to use it with care. If you paint your whole bedroom in peach, chances are that you will attract someone, and then someone else, and someone else... If you're married, you might attract unwanted attention. Consider instead using peach as an accent tone on pillows, throws, and small objects. While accent walls and wallpapers can be tempting, they should be kept to a minimum and also have gentle colors and limited patterns.

Creating good feng shui for your home will be easy when you start with AYRIAL Feng Shui to learn the basics of classical feng shui. AYRIAL will provide inspiring, amusing and enlightening feng shui tips every day from Viviana Estrada. Viviana is a certified feng shui practitioner who studied in Asia and in the USA with recognized Chinese metaphysics masters including Joey Yap, founder and master trainer of the Mastery Academy of Chinese Metaphysics, Vincent Koh, founder of the Singapore Feng Shui Centre, and Lillian Too, founder and Grand Master at the Lillian Too’s Institute of Feng Shui.
The ideal location of your bedroom is far from any doors that open to the outside world. Avoid bedrooms with sloping roofs. If you have to sleep underneath a sloping roof, you can use a canopy bed to weaken the effect. A canopy can also provide protection from other negative ceiling elements, like bright light fixtures, a bathroom on the floor directly above you, and a ceiling fan.

If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
Nature creates a sense of peace. In fact, research shows that viewing nature reduces anger and anxiety and enhances feelings of pleasure. So flood your home with natural light, open windows and doors to let fresh air inside, and bring plants indoors. Decorate with bamboo, wood, or wicker, and use stones and rocks to add texture. You can also adorn the walls with paintings of nature and its serenity.
Looking for an easy way to incorportate feng shui principles into your bedroom décor? Home accessories offer a low-cost, low-commitment way to test them out in your space. "If you are a feng shui minimalist in how you approach enhancing your bedroom's energy, one area that could be utilized as a soft focal point is with the bed accessories themselves," says Cerrano.
"Family pictures don't belong in the bedroom," says Whitehurst. "It's the most intimate room in the house and should be reserved for you and your partner." Pictures of children, relatives, and friends may cause you to think about your obligations — and that doesn't allow the mind (or body) to rest. So keep only pictures of you and your spouse or partner in the bedroom, and put other pictures in the dining or family rooms.
The best feng shui advice for choosing bedroom art is to choose images that you want to see happening in your life; you want images with nourishing, happy and beautiful energy. Unless you enjoy being sad and lonely, do not use sad and lonely images in your bedroom. Best art for the bedroom are images related to the emotions of love, happy relationships, body healing, and intimacy.

The main door to the room or space is called the "mouth of chi," and it's thought to be the portal through which energy comes into your home and life. When you are cooking at the stove (or sleeping in bed, or sitting at your desk), it’s best if you can see the door but not be directly in line with it. It's best to be diagonal from the door, while still facing it. Understandably, this is not always possible, so you can make adjustments like placing a mirror such that you can see the door in the reflection while cooking at the stove (or sleeping in bed, or sitting at your desk). If that’s still not doable, you can use a faceted feng shui crystal ball and hang it between the door and the object.
Small bookshelves are fine. However, if you have bookshelves that are more than six feet (180 cm) tall, then you are better off without the bookshelf. The reason is that the large furniture can give you that invisible pressure that makes you feel oppressed. It’s similar to the feeling you get when you drive right next to a truck or when you’re standing right under a monumental structure.
Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world. Learn More

Because your bed is the biggest (hopefully!) and the most important piece of furniture in your bedroom, it is very important to follow a good feng shui bedroom layout. Positioning your bed in the best feng shui spot for your bedroom will create better energy in your space, and you will be the one to benefit from it! How do you find the best feng shui spot in your bedroom? Does it require a lot of guessing work or are there good feng shui bedroom layouts that you can just follow in any bedroom?


So what is feng shui? “Feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is a design system for arranging your surroundings in harmony and balance with the natural world around you,” explains Carol M. Olmstead, FSIA, feng shui master practitioner at Feng Shui for Real Life. “Your surroundings have a powerful effect on what you attract into your life. When the energy around you is blocked, your prosperity, relationships, health, and well-being can be affected. When the energy is balanced, good things naturally flow into your life.”

The essence of these life-giving elements is chi, or life force. Wind and water are direct carriers of chi, as their flowing quality reflects their essential nature. All living organisms are largely composed of these two elements. Thus, Feng Shui is the art of designing environments in harmony with the flow of chi through one’s living space, and this flow supports and enhances one’s personal chi or life force.
I decided to implement every single big-payoff tip to see what would happen. I put a cool-looking symbol under my bed that was supposed to bring me a husband (nope), did a ceremonial orange peel water sprinkling around my house to create good fortune (couldn’t tell the difference) and buried coins in rice in a big vase to bring money (also, no dice). I couldn’t understand why this stuff didn’t work for me.
Anjie Cho, feng shui expert, interior designer and creator of Holistic Spaces, says, “Your bedroom represents you. Other than maybe your office, you spend a majority of your time in your bedroom, especially if you get six to eight hours of sleep at night.” And that’s when the so-called magic happens: “Because you’re unconscious and in a passive state while you sleep, you’re open to absorbing energy around you more easily,” Cho says.
Victorian-era commentators on feng shui were generally ethnocentric, and as such skeptical and derogatory of what they knew of feng shui.[66] In 1896, at a meeting of the Educational Association of China, Rev. P.W. Pitcher railed at the "rottenness of the whole scheme of Chinese architecture," and urged fellow missionaries "to erect unabashedly Western edifices of several stories and with towering spires in order to destroy nonsense about fung-shuy".[67]
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