We have a master bath attached to our bedroom. The only way to place our bed ends up with our feet facing the bathroom wall (not the door itself) It is way too tight of a squeeze to put any furniture at the foot of the bed, and we can’t afford a tall footboard. Even if we could, it would squish my hubby, because his feet almost dangle the way it is. There is a dresser against the wall adjoining the bathroom. I am super superstitious and found this fung shui by accident. Is this horrible luck, even if we keep the bathroom door closed? Everything else that I’ve read (and I’m not reading anymore lol) seems to be good in the bedroom. We can see the bedroom door well, and the head of the bed is not on the same wall with a closet, main door, or window. It also isn’t against the adjoining bathroom wall. It is balanced, and honestly, I love my bedroom. I have just recently started having major insomnia around 3 months ago, but we have lived here for 1.5 years with no issues prior. I’ve actually slept like a baby until this issue began. Thanks!
My bagua number is 1 and I have to sleep in the west area of my home. South is my best direction. Please can you tell me what I can do to lessen the effects of the west area in 2017. My walls are cream, side tables are cream, and my bedspread is silver grey. I do have difficulty having a restful sleep and often wake up several times in the night. Please will you advise. The TV is covered overnight.
7. Let there be light. When lighting your bedroom, flexibility is key. You want lots of natural light during the day, soft light in the evening, and darkness while you sleep. Exposure to sunlight first thing in the morning influences your serotonin levels and can affect you for the rest of the day. When choosing your light, make sure to provide a variety of sources, include overhead, table, and wall lighting.

Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
×