Bright lights keep us awake and can disrupt our sleep pattern. It is true even with artificial lights and especially true for LED lights, which is known to create “light pollution” that causes sleepless nights (this is also the reason why it’s bad feng shui to sleep with your head under a window). Try to use dim lights with a soothing color, as it can provide the atmosphere and environment as you are getting ready for bed.
The #1 good feng shui bedroom layout is with the so-called feng shui commanding position of the bed. A bed in a feng shui commanding position is placed diagonally from the bedroom door and has a solid wall behind it. It has a good solid headboard, good grounding energy on both sides (the nightstands do not have to be identical, not at all, you can be as creative as you feel like, but be sure the bed is supported/grounded on both sides.)
You are in complete control of the lights in your bedroom. However, you have little or no control of the lights outside of your home. That is why you need blinds and curtains that can completely block out the light from the outside. If your current blinds or curtains have light shining through the cracks at night, it may be worthy to invest in double layered curtains to improve your sleep sleep.
Get rid of clothes you no longer wear. Go through your closet and drawer and remove all of the clothes you haven't worn within the last year. Donate these clothes or pass them on to a friend or relative if they can still be worn. Even though you may not see the old clothes, keeping them in your bedroom may prevent you from embracing new opportunities.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.

It may take just a tiny bit of getting used to, but once you get in the habit of keeping the lid closed on your toilet, you’ll never go back. Here’s why feng shui wisdom considers it important: the toilet literally pulls water and waste down and out of the room. This downward spiraling motion contributes to pulling energy out of your home. This, in turn, corresponds with pulling money and resources out of your life. Simply keeping the toilet lid closed when it’s not in use counterbalances this challenge. And anyway, it’s a much more pleasing and attractive (not to mention hygienic!) design choice. I mean, the toilet conveniently comes with a lid, so you might as well close that thing!


A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
×