A few years later I found feng shui again, but this time with a new viewpoint: a Western viewpoint, grounded in tradition but also in science, so it made new sense to me. I tried more feng shui tips from this point of view, but this time the tips seemed to have more of a connection to my actual living space and lifestyle. They forced me to readjust myself in my space and see things in a new way.
Welcome to the world of AYRIAL with the daily AYRIAL: Feng Shui skill! Feng shui is an ancient practice developed over 3,000 years ago in China. Feng shui is not religion or superstition; it is a science because its formulas and fundamentals are based on empirical research and it is an art because experience and judgment are critical in the analysis. Feng Shui focuses on the study of Qi (pronounced “chi”, which is energy) and how it can be harnessed to create harmonious living; better health, successful career or business, and fulfilling relationships for the people inhabiting the space.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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