The best feng shui advice for choosing bedroom art is to choose images that you want to see happening in your life; you want images with nourishing, happy and beautiful energy. Unless you enjoy being sad and lonely, do not use sad and lonely images in your bedroom. Best art for the bedroom are images related to the emotions of love, happy relationships, body healing, and intimacy.
The Five Elements is the collective name used to describe the colors, shapes, and textures around you. The Elements are: Fire, Earth, Metal, Water, and Wood. Each Element is distinguished by a characteristic shape, colors, and set of attributes. Feng Shui improvements for homes and offices balance all of these Elements in your interior environment.
Feng shui is a set of principles to help align one’s living space with who they are and what they want. The practice has been around for thousands of years, but it’s not stodgy or outdated. In fact, it’s seen quite the Western resurgence in recent years, with thousands of trained feng shui consultants currently offering services across the country. Oddly enough, even Donald Trump reportedly hired a feng shui consultant back in 1995.
You'll also want to consult a Bagua map to see what elements to pull into your space. Locate what Bagua your bedroom is located in relationship to the front door of your house, and add accessories accordingly. For example, if your bedroom falls in the Health and Family area, where the dominant element is wood, try to incorporate greens and blues in order to sustain that element.
Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]
It should come as no surprise that natural light can make us feel happier and more positive. "Mirrors in feng shui are like aspirin," jokes Benko. "They're prescribed often to treat many ailments. They're a quick adjustment when you want to expand a space, and bring in more light." The key here is to be very mindful of what the mirrors reflect. Is it a stack of bills (i.e. more clutter) or a beautiful view?
After the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, feng shui was officially considered a "feudalistic superstitious practice" and a "social evil" according to the state's ideology and was discouraged and even banned outright at times.[68][69] Feng shui remained popular in Hong Kong, and also in the Republic of China (Taiwan), where traditional culture was not suppressed.[70]

A bedroom is no place for an office. A creative corner, maybe, but a technology-filled, deadline-driven, endless to-do list office? A constant reminder of your unread inbox does not cultivate rest or intimacy. Consider a mobile office that partners a laptop with your dining room table (and attractive storage for all your supplies) before you resort to a bedroom office.

Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.
The AYRIAL feng shui tips are very good and not the basic information you can easily find on the internet or outdated YouTube videos. Afterall, classical feng shui is an ancient Chinese philosophy and it’s extremely important to be precise with its information and implementation. While the AYRIAL Feng Shui tips are short and sweet, they are sufficient enough to get the picture. And, of course you can repeat the daily feng shui tip throughout the day.
Ok, let’s move on to specific feng shui wealth essentials. The main feng shui wealth color is gold, gold, gold (of course!)  In any decor items – mirrors,  frames, lamp bases, trays, coffee tables, etc – whatever your house decor can feel harmonious and happy with! Just be sure to actually love those golden beauties, do not bring something just for the sake of its look if you are not connected to it emotionally.
Hello, I have a question about your article: “Feng Shui Tips for Money”. Your article says to replace any broken items in your home. We live in a rented apartment and the landlord did not do the usual fix-ups when the former tenants moved out. We moved in with the blinds broken in all four window, cracked closet doors, the door frame to the master bedroom is broken and won’t stay shut when closed (you can simply push the door open when “closed”, you don’t need to use the door knob to open/close the door), bathroom tiles messed up such that you have a hard time opening/closing the door and the closet inside the bathroom, problems with plumbing and the stove and refrigerator…crayola marks everywhere, cigarette burns in the carpets and you get the idea here. The apartment was in such a poor state, we refused to give the landlord a deposit unless we could do a walk-through with him and get it in writing about all the broken and poor conditions of everything. He had a fit and would not do it. We’ve been living here since late August, 2015. He finally fixed the plumbing issues and our heater. But that’s all he fixed. We are not responsible for any of the other things, so how would your Feng Shui tips to repair broken things in the home really apply in our situation? What would be a “work around” for NOT doing repairs to a rented apartment, when they were already there when we moved into the unit? Also, about the citrine in the windowsill.. we have four large windows, each with a windowsill. Do I put a piece of citrine in just one of them or in all four? If in only one windowsill, which one? Kitchen, living room, master bedroom (this is being used as our temple/cat room) – or in our bedroom?
Many people live in homes where they drive up into the garage and use the back door to get in. While this is very convenient, from a Feng Shui perspective this may limit good energy and opportunities in your life because again, the entry door represents how chi enters your home and life. The easy Feng Shui fix? Start using the front door at least once week. The more often the better! Just open and close it when you go get the mail, or maybe to take walk. Write it into your regular routine.
By now, it's commonly known (although widely ignored) that TVs, phones, and other electronics are causing us to get less sleep. But Cerrano takes it a step further, warning against electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from tech devices in the bedroom, especially if someone is ill or hyper-sensitive. She even advises turning off the wifi before going to bed, as it "can penetrate the mind and body." Note: Research around the effects of EMFs is slim, according to the World Health Organization, but positioning your wifi router away from wherever you spend the most time and even turning it off at night is still a good idea.
Last but not least, do a space clearing. Our homes and environments retain the energetic imprint of those that inhabit the spaces. It is always good to just take a little time and burn off the old energy to welcome fresh and new chi. My favorite methods of space clearing are the following: burn palo santo, smudge with white sage or spraying natural orange essential oil with water. Palo santo is light and great for everyday use. White sage is heavier for the heavy duty space clearing. And the orange oil is great if you also need something to uplift your mood. Whatever you use, make sure to imagine the space being filled with positive energy and your dreams for the future.
Experts have mentioned that the dragon turtle can also neutralize the negative energy from the annual Flying Stars, particularly the #2 and #5 stars. Further, others have mentioned that it can cure the bad Feng Shui caused by two doors facing each other. To use it, simply place it somewhere in between those two doors, whether that be two bedroom doors within a house or two front doors of two different houses.
Nature creates a sense of peace. In fact, research shows that viewing nature reduces anger and anxiety and enhances feelings of pleasure. So flood your home with natural light, open windows and doors to let fresh air inside, and bring plants indoors. Decorate with bamboo, wood, or wicker, and use stones and rocks to add texture. You can also adorn the walls with paintings of nature and its serenity.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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