Feng Shui is a term composed of two Chinese words: feng (wind) and shui (water). Wind and water are the two natural elements that flow, move, and circulate everywhere on Earth. They are also the most basic elements required for human survival. Wind — or air — is the breath of life; without it, we would die in moments. And water is the liquid of life; without it, we would die in days. The combined qualities of wind and water determine the climate, which historically has determined our food supply and in turn affects our lifestyle, health, energy, and mood. These two fundamental and flowing elements have always profoundly yet subtly influenced human individuals and societies.

Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!
Feng Shui practitioners from many cultures believe that displaying objects around your home in specific number combinations can enhance your life and help you attract wealth, harmony, and love. The origins of Feng Shui are Chinese, and the Chinese meaning of a number is often associated with its pronunciation. This means that numbers can be misinterpreted in Western culture if the meaning given to them is based on the way they sound in Chinese.
If you’ve ever had a chat with a real estate agent about dated house fixtures in tacky gold finish, they will tell you that these houses are much loved by most Asian buyers. I’ve had clients who lived in such houses, and even though they hated the fixtures they feared changing them because that would be bad feng shui. The only bad feng shui was actually keeping those dated fixtures!
While some traditional Chinese feng shui money cures such as the three legged toad, the Dragon Turtle, the Gem Tree or the Lucky Cat might not appeal to your taste (I know I do not use them!); there are still plenty of popular and powerful feng shui for wealth cures that you might like. Look into the Lucky Bamboo, the Wealth Ship or the Money Tree, to name just a few, and see if your money area can benefit from their energy.
In Feng Shui, we use the “commanding position” to locate important furniture such as your bed. The bed is arguably the most important piece of furniture to put in the commanding position because you spend so many passive hours sleeping! To place your bed in the commanding position, you want to be facing the door while not in line with the door while lying in bed. Ideally you can be diagonally across the room from your bedroom door. However, I understand this is not always possible. In that case, find a mirror and place it so that you can see the door while lying in bed. I suggest freestanding mirrors, as they’re easier to move around and get just right.
The five elements can interact in any number of ways, some constructive and some destructive. In the constructive cycle, for example, water provides moisture for trees (wood) to grow; wood then becomes a fuel for fire; the residue of fire is ash or soil; the ash/soil is the essence of earth minerals that form metals; and as metal cool, they allow water to condense, completing the cycle. In a destructive cycle, on the other hand, metal can cut wood; and wood can grow over and consume soil.  
Katherine Hurst used to live a normal life until something happened that changed her life forever. She discovered the Law of Attraction and began a new, life-changing chapter. She now runs the world's largest Law of Attraction community with millions of followers. Her mission is to share her own experiences to inspire change and happiness in the lives of all.
The essence of these life-giving elements is chi, or life force. Wind and water are direct carriers of chi, as their flowing quality reflects their essential nature. All living organisms are largely composed of these two elements. Thus, Feng Shui is the art of designing environments in harmony with the flow of chi through one’s living space, and this flow supports and enhances one’s personal chi or life force.
On the surface, Feng Shui is the simple interaction of humans and their environments. Taken a step further, Feng Shui enables you to influence these interacting energies to achieve specific life improvements. This influence is achieved by positioning or designing your surroundings in harmony with principles of natural energy flow. As a result, you (and your life) can achieve harmony with your surroundings. Feng Shui is practical and grounding, and it helps you right where you live and work.
Have inspiring art in your bedroom. Hang up images of calming scenes from nature, or other places that inspire you. Pick some neutral scenery, an image that motivates you to achieve your dreams, or something else that puts you in a calm and peaceful frame of mind. Anything too graphic, gory or just disturbing does not belong in your bedroom. Place the most inspiring image across from your line of sight in the bed, so that it's the first thing you see when you wake up.[7]
An old feng shui remedy for finances is to hang a mirror in the dining room so that it reflects the dining table. The dining table is a symbol of a family's abundance since meals are served here to nourish and support the family. A mirror will double abundance. Just be sure that the mirror doesn't reflect an exterior door or opportunities and money will be bounced right out of the house!
Whether you’re on a Marie Kondo-inspired cleaning kick or made a New Year’s resolution to focus on self care, the bedroom is a great place to focus that fresh-start energy. While decluttering is always an excellent way to begin, it may also be time to feng shui your bedroom, which will not only leave it looking nicer but may also help you sleep better.
AYRIAL is a new kind of body, mind and spirit association that features exceptional and vetted feng shui practitioners, astrologers, authentic spiritual mediums, dream experts, meditation teachers and life coaches. In addition to our online presence, we utilize the latest technology to make it easy for users to connect with a lifestyle consultant and to showcase exclusive content via smartphones using the AYRIAL app available on iTunes and Google Play. We will also be releasing new Alexa skills soon!
Anjie Cho, feng shui expert, interior designer and creator of Holistic Spaces, says, “Your bedroom represents you. Other than maybe your office, you spend a majority of your time in your bedroom, especially if you get six to eight hours of sleep at night.” And that’s when the so-called magic happens: “Because you’re unconscious and in a passive state while you sleep, you’re open to absorbing energy around you more easily,” Cho says.
An old feng shui remedy for finances is to hang a mirror in the dining room so that it reflects the dining table. The dining table is a symbol of a family's abundance since meals are served here to nourish and support the family. A mirror will double abundance. Just be sure that the mirror doesn't reflect an exterior door or opportunities and money will be bounced right out of the house!
Think of your bedroom as an oasis. Your bedroom should be your sanctuary. It should be an escape from the stress of your everyday life, whether those include your work, your children, your health, or your friendships. It should not be a place where you throw all of the extra things you have no place for. On the contrary, it should be your oasis in the middle of a desert, a place you can come to when you want to rest -- or just when you need a break.[5]
When building the new entrance to Hong Kong Disneyland, Walt Disney executives decided to shift the angle of the front gate by 12 degrees. They did so after consulting a feng shui specialist, who said the change would ensure prosperity for the park. Disney also put a bend in the walkway from the train station to the gate, to make sure the flow of positive energy, or chi, did not slip past the entrance and out to the China Sea. Heeding the advice of a feng shui consultant is one of many steps Disney executives have taken at the park to reflect the local culture -- and to make sure they do not repeat some mistakes of the past.

That's up to you. Some people love looking outside and seeing life go by; others feel invaded. But if you have a big window opposite the front door, the energy can fly right out the window, so it's good to address that: Use drapes or blinds. Or put something in front of the window, like a plant or a pretty reflective bowl, to bounce energy back into the room.


The Chinese people consider that you can attract luck and prosperity in your career by using money, just not any kind of money, but I-Ching coins. These are round coins, with a square cut out in the center, linked together with a red silk thread. These tiny coins can be carried in the wallet, or connected to the phone, after the latest fashion trend. The most important thing is to carry them with you, especially if you work in retail or sales, to bring you luck.
Rearrange furniture to help the chi energy to move freely around your house. Visualize the chi energy as water entering your home and attempting to flow from room to room. Move the furniture out of the natural pathways and don't overcrowd rooms with furniture. Leave space enough between pieces of furniture so the chi energy can move about the entire room.
Feng Shui is the ancient Chinese system of natural laws which are supposed to govern the spatial arrangement orientation of your furniture and décor in relation to the flow of energy (Chi). The word ‘feng’ is Chinese for wind, and the word ‘shui’ is Chinese for water – together these symbolise the flow of life that one should aspire to have in one’s home.

A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."
Similar to meditation, the practice of feng shui is deeply steeped in mindfulness, in slowing down and noticing the details in your life so that you can truly experience the present moment. The words "feng shui" are Chinese and translate to "wind" and "water." Wind is our breath, and humans are almost 60 percent water. Wind and water are vital elements for life, as is feng shui! Historically, feng shui has roots in Taoism and Buddhism. However, elements of feng shui are palpable in every culture across time. For instance, these days we can all feel the difference between a New York City apartment and a quiet hidden cabin in the forest, and we understand that our surroundings greatly affect our energy.
Small bookshelves are fine. However, if you have bookshelves that are more than six feet (180 cm) tall, then you are better off without the bookshelf. The reason is that the large furniture can give you that invisible pressure that makes you feel oppressed. It’s similar to the feeling you get when you drive right next to a truck or when you’re standing right under a monumental structure.
The Solution: If you have that configuration in your kitchen, no need to gut renovate just yet. Instead, put a wood element between the sink and stove—water feeds wood, and wood feeds fire. So in this case, wood acts like a mitigating element between the two opposing forces. Wood is also represented by the color green in feng shui, which can be used instead of the actual material. 
My bagua number is 1 and I have to sleep in the west area of my home. South is my best direction. Please can you tell me what I can do to lessen the effects of the west area in 2017. My walls are cream, side tables are cream, and my bedspread is silver grey. I do have difficulty having a restful sleep and often wake up several times in the night. Please will you advise. The TV is covered overnight.

Katherine Hurst used to live a normal life until something happened that changed her life forever. She discovered the Law of Attraction and began a new, life-changing chapter. She now runs the world's largest Law of Attraction community with millions of followers. Her mission is to share her own experiences to inspire change and happiness in the lives of all.
According to Brophy, clinging to the past disturbs peace in the present. "Keeping objects out of obligation or reluctance to let go is an issue," Brophy says. "I worked with a client who kept a bed frame that her husband used to sleep in with his ex-wife. Every time she looked at that bed frame she was reminded of his past. If you have furnishings or artwork that you fought your family member to obtain, or won in divorce proceedings, evaluate the energetic cost of keeping such things."

Leaving the bathroom door open will affect the air quality of your bedroom. For instance, if you just finished “taking care of business”, and you left the bathroom door open, the smell can easily travel to your bedroom, which can significantly affect how fast you fall asleep. Worse, if you have mold in your bathroom, your may be suffering from health problems such as muscle and joint pain, headaches, shortness of breathe, sinus problems, and more.


In feng shui, there are private (yin) spaces, like bedrooms, and public (yang) spaces, like living rooms. A TV in a public space is OK. A television often becomes the focal point, which is fine if that's what you want. But if the intention of the room is, say, to gather the family, then keep the TV in something closed or in a less-than-central spot on the wall, so it doesn't dominate. For a family space, it's also nice to have a soft ottoman in place of a coffee table, so the kids can be in the center of the action.
The feng shui energy map or bagua is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the "I Ching," the ancient oracle and text that feng shui is based on. Knowing the bagua (pronounced "bag-wha") of your home and of the rooms within it will help you understand the connection between different areas and specific aspects of your life experience. The bagua is essentially a mapping chart by which you can assess and improve how different parts of the home affect specific areas of your life such as love, health, or wealth. You can use it to determine how to position furniture and other objects within the room for the maximum positive benefit. 
Eight diagrams known as bagua (or pa kua) loom large in feng shui, and both predate their mentions in the Yijing (or I Ching).[citation needed] The Lo (River) Chart (Luoshu) was developed first,[34] and is sometimes associated with Later Heaven arrangement of the bagua. This and the Yellow River Chart (Hetu, sometimes associated with the Earlier Heaven bagua) are linked to astronomical events of the sixth millennium BC, and with the Turtle Calendar from the time of Yao.[35] The Turtle Calendar of Yao (found in the Yaodian section of the Shangshu or Book of Documents) dates to 2300 BC, plus or minus 250 years.[36]
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