Keep your bed far away from any TVs, desks, or other distractions. Ideally, you should move your desk and television out of your bedroom, so the bedroom truly becomes a place where you can rest and relax. However, we all have limited space, so if you do have a television or a desk in your room, position it as far from your bed as possible to not get in the way of the bed's positive energy. If you can, drape a light scarf or blanket over the TV or desk, or even cover it up with a Japanese folding closet to create even more space.
Where you place your bed is very important in feng shui. Choose the wrong wall and you risk a long string of restless nights. The path from your bedroom door to the window has the strongest flow of energy; keep your bed out of this path if possible. Positioning your bed in front of a window is a big feng shui no-no. Ideally you should have a solid headboard or wall behind your bed (no diagonal placement either), a small table or chair on either side for support, and a low bench or a trunk at the foot of the bed.
In feng shui, placing your bed in a “commanding position” is key. This means that your bed isn’t directly in line with the door and that you can see the door in front of you when you’re lying down. The commanding position puts you in a “safe” place and gives you a sense of stability (both physical and metamorphic) because you can spot whatever enters your space. Another important part of positioning your bed is to make sure you have equal room on both sides, so both people are able to get into bed easily. By making space, you create a balance of energy on either side of the bed.
Ancient feng shui masters knew what quantum physics is telling us today — that everything around us is composed of endless energy fields connecting everything you see, feel and touch (as well as millions of things we do not see with our physical eyes). There is really no separation between you and everything that surrounds you, and this, of course, includes your home.
This practice speaks more to everyday habits than layout or décor, but Cerrano stresses that it's nonetheless important: "Making your bed may seem small and insignificant, yet a greater development within your conscious and subconscious minds is evolving. This simple act becomes your first accomplishment of the day and it only requires two minutes of your time. This also creates a mind-set of being organised, which helps reduce stress and increase motivation. It’s also a means of self-respect, because it means you've taken the time to prepare your bed for sleep as your mom or dad may have done during childhood. It's a little slice of self-love."
Beginning with palatial structures at Erlitou,[10] all capital cities of China followed rules of feng shui for their design and layout. During the Zhou era, the Kaogong ji (simplified Chinese: 考工记; traditional Chinese: 考工記; "Manual of Crafts") codified these rules. The carpenter's manual Lu ban jing (simplified Chinese: 鲁班经; traditional Chinese: 魯班經; "Lu ban's manuscript") codified rules for builders. Graves and tombs also followed rules of feng shui, from Puyang to Mawangdui and beyond. From the earliest records, the structures of the graves and dwellings seem to have followed the same rules.
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