If placing the wardrobe around the bed on both sides instead of placing it in the wall adjacent to the bed, I wouldn’t put any storage above or below the bed (I would be able to walk around in both sides of the bed too, although the wardrobe will occupy some space, being around 2 feet in depth), there could be built-in nightstands on both sides of the wardrobe and I could also opt for a Murphy bed/wall bed, in which case, when closing the bed, I would have more space in the room to roll out a yoga mat. That’s what I’d prefer to do, but I don’t know if this arrangement would pose any issues. If having the wardrobe around the bed, I would probably still have to build an additional small wardrobe in the left hand side next to a narrow dresser in front of the bed in case I need the extra space.
Matteo Ricci (1552–1610), one of the founding fathers of Jesuit China missions, may have been the first European to write about feng shui practices. His account in De Christiana expeditione apud Sinas... tells about feng shui masters (geologi, in Latin) studying prospective construction sites or grave sites "with reference to the head and the tail and the feet of the particular dragons which are supposed to dwell beneath that spot". As a Catholic missionary, Ricci strongly criticized the "recondite science" of geomancy along with astrology as yet another superstitio absurdissima of the heathens: "What could be more absurd than their imagining that the safety of a family, honors, and their entire existence must depend upon such trifles as a door being opened from one side or another, as rain falling into a courtyard from the right or from the left, a window opened here or there, or one roof being higher than another?".[65]

You can't benefit from the positive energies (or opportunities) that flow through your front door if they zip right out the back door. If you open the front door and there's a direct line to the back door or a window, that's runaway chi. "You want chi to run in a meandering pattern so it can deposit good energy throughout your home," says Varone. You can stop runaway chi by placing furniture or some other decorative object in or near the questionable path and by using rugs to impede energy flow. Hanging a room separator or a faceted crystal near one of the doors will help, too.


Books, courses, and online resources are all terrific ways to learn more about feng shui in order to see your own environment with new eyes. A trained feng shui expert can provide in-depth treatment of your space, help in selecting a layout and furnishings, or calculate the best location for a home or business. Add feng shui to your arsenal of strategies for attracting good fortune and avoiding negative energy. The feng shui principles you use to invite positive chi into your life are as timeless as wind and water.
Still others are simply skeptical of feng shui. Evidence for its effectiveness is based primarily upon anecdote and users are often offered conflicting advice from different practitioners. Feng shui practitioners use these differences as evidence of variations in practice or different schools of thought. Critical analysts have described it thus: "Feng shui has always been based upon mere guesswork".[81][82] Some are skeptical of feng shui's lasting impact.[83] Mark Johnson:[84]
4. Ventilate and brighten, in other words encourage good quality air to circulate and let lots of light into your house. These two elements are essential for good chi. Open bedroom windows first thing in the morning to allow moisture to escape (taking care not to leave ground floor rooms unattended for security reasons). And once you’ve exhausted all possible avenues to let in natural light, consider using full-spectrum lighting to further brighten up a space.
The southeast sector is the wealth sector and can be activated by good luck charms and feng shui cures. Stimulate it by adding the element of wood, like a jade plant, or a symbol of wealth, like three Chinese coins tied together with a red ribbon. A three-legged toad with a Chinese coin in its mouth is also an auspicious symbol of wealth. A water feature will feed the wood element and stimulate a growth in wealth. Be sure the water flows into the home and not away.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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